maxillofacial injury

maxillofacial injury

Any injury of the upper jaw bone and face.

maxillofacial injury

Trauma surgery Any injury of the upper jaw bone and face. See Le Fort fracture.
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Another case of HS associated with maxillofacial injury was reported by Pruett.[25] The described case was of a 5-year-old child who sustained intraoral trauma while running with an object in the mouth, following injury; he was eventually diagnosed with HS secondary to blunt intraoral trauma to the internal carotid sympathetic plexus.
Most common were extremity injury (n=168,86% of all patients), thoracic injury (n=103, 53%), head injury (n=100, 51%), and maxillofacial injury (n=39, 20%).
The general treatment guidelines for a penetrating maxillofacial injury are to decompress, debride, and avoid neurovascular injury and the subsequent complications.
All records of interpersonal violence victims that resulted in maxillofacial injury and / or injury to other body regions between January 2008 and December 2011 were included, totaling 7,132 cases.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study included all consecutive maxillofacial injury patients approaching Gajra Raja Medical College (G.
Sex Male Female Variable n % n % Age (years) 0-4 8 61.5 5 38.5 5-9 16 66.6 8 33.4 10-14 35 76.1 11 23.9 15-19 112 75.2 37 24.8 Total 171 73.7 61 26.3 Victim of accident Pedestrian 39 69.6 17 30.4 Cyclist 5 100.0 0 0.0 Motorcycle 95 79.8 24 20.2 Occupant vehicle 30 60.0 20 40.0 Others 2 100.0 0 0.0 Total Variable Ratio n % Age (years) 0-4 1.6:1 13 5.6 5-9 2:1 24 10.4 10-14 3.2:1 46 19.8 15-19 3:1 149 64.2 Total 2.8:1 232 100.0 Victim of accident Pedestrian 2.3:1 56 24.1 Cyclist -- 5 2.2 Motorcycle 3.9:1 119 51.3 Occupant vehicle 1.5:1 50 21.6 Others -- 2 0.9 TABLE 2: Distribution of victims according to the number of lesions, existence of fracture, maxillofacial injury, and anatomical region involved in Campina Grande, Brazil.
The mandible fracture was the most frequent maxillofacial injury for both man and woman.
The management of the paediatric patient with maxillofacial injury should take into consideration the differences in anatomy and physiology between children and adults, the presence of concomitant injury, the particular stage in growth and development (anatomic, physiologic, and psychological), and the specific injuries and anatomic sites that the injuries affect [Haug and Foss, 2000].
Maxillofacial injury was predominant in the 60-70-year age group and there was no significant association between different age groups and causes of trauma (p-value =0.813).
DISCUSSION: This study included 78 patients who had a history of maxillofacial injury and was found to have fractures involving the facial bone.
Maxillofacial injury severity score: Proposal of a new scoring system.