maturation


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Related to maturation: sperm maturation

maturation

 [mach″u-ra´shun]
1. the stage or process of attaining maximal development; attainment of maximal intellectual and emotional development.
2. in biology, a process of cell division during which the number of chromosomes in the germ cell is reduced to half the number characteristic of the species.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mat·u·ra·tion

(mat'yū-rā'shŭn),
1. Achievement of full development or growth.
2. Developmental changes that lead to maturity.
3. Processing of a macromolecule, for example, posttranscriptional modification of RNA or posttranslational modification of proteins.
4. The overall process leading to the incorporation of a viral genome into a capsid and the development of a complete virion.
[L. maturatio, a ripening, fr. maturus, ripe]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

maturation

(măch′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The process of becoming mature.
2. Biology
a. The processes by which gametes are formed, including the reduction of chromosomes in a germ cell from the diploid number to the haploid number by meiosis.
b. The final differentiation processes in biological systems, such as the final ripening of a seed or the attainment of full functional capacity by a cell, a tissue, or an organ.

mat′u·ra′tion·al adj.
mat′u·ra′tive adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

maturation

The process of development.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mat·u·ra·tion

(mach'ūr-ā'shŭn)
1. Achievement of full development or growth.
2. Developmental changes that lead to maturity.
3. Processing of a macromolecule; e.g., posttranscriptional modification of RNA or posttranslational modification of proteins.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

maturation (viral)

the collection of infective VIRIONS produced in the host cell.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Maturation

The process by which stem cells transform from immature cells without a specific function into a particular type of blood cell with defined functions.
Mentioned in: Leukemias, Chronic
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mat·u·ra·tion

(mach'ūr-ā'shŭn)
Achievement of full development or growth.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the nuclear maturation, oocytes experience the cytoplasmic maturation, including rearrangement of many organelles, cortical granules, for fertilization process (Voronina et al., 2003).
Significance: In-vitro maturation is a very useful method because it has the potential to collect a large number of oocytes from an ovary of dead or slaughtered animal.
Then, groups of ten COCs were placed in 50 ul maturation drops which was covered with mineral oil and incubated in a 100% humidified atmosphere and 5% CO2 for 24 h at 38.5AdegC.
The means of maturation and cleavage rates, different stages of in vitro development and relative gene expression in all groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-LSD Dunnett's test.
Stress due to negative experiences during childhood, such as illness or divorce, appears to be related to faster maturation of the prefrontal cortex and amygdala in adolescence.
Cumulus cell expansions of COCs were evaluated at the end of maturation period under a stereomicroscope.
The second group included 10 GV oocytes which after retrieval were directly undergone the in vitro maturation. The third group included 113 GV oocytes that had initially undergone IVM oocytes and then were vitrified\ thawed.
By the administration of a human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) trigger prior to oocyte collection, "hCG priming," the resumption of meiosis begins and subsequently oocytes are collected that may be at varying stages of the maturation process; GV, MI, or MII oocytes.
Results: No significant difference existed between the maturation rates in [alpha]-MEM (68.18%) and ESCM (64.67%; p>0.05), whereas this rate was significantly higher for both [alpha]-MEM and ESCM compared to ESGM (32.22%; p<0.05).