matter

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matter

 [mat´er]
1. physical material having form and weight under ordinary conditions; called also substance.
2. pus.
gray matter areas of the nervous system where the nerve fibers are unmyelinated (not enveloped by a myelin sheath); it contains the bodies of the nerve cells. Tissue composed of myelinated fibers is called white matter. The cerebral cortex is entirely composed of gray matter and the cerebellum also contains some deep-seated masses of it. The spinal cord has a central core of gray matter surrounded by white matter; in cross section, its gray matter is shaped approximately like the letter H. Called also substantia grisea and gray substance.
white matter areas of the nervous system composed mostly of myelinated nerve fibers (those having myelin sheaths) constituting the conducting portion of the brain and spinal cord. Tissue composed of unmyelinated fibers is called gray matter. Called also substantia alba and white substance.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stănts),
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA], matter
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub- sto, to stand under, be present]

matter

(măt′ər)
n.
1. A specific type of substance.
2. Discharge or waste, such as pus or feces, from a living organism.

matter

Anatomy
Material substance that occupies cavities.

Physics
Material substance that occupies space.

matter

Anatomy Stuff that occupies cavities. See Gray matter, White matter.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stăns)
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA] , matter.
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub-sto, to stand under, be present]

matter

that which constitutes the substance of physical forms, has mass, occupies space and can be quantified.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another change is also found in Rosenberg's (1985) composition of the dimensions of mattering. Rosenberg revisited the three dimensions (attention, importance, and dependence) and added two more senses of mattering: ego-extension and being missed.
Rosenberg's dimensional model of mattering and categorization (Rosenberg, 1985; Rosenberg & McCullough, 1981) influenced the development of measurement tools (e.g., Marcus, 1991; Marshall, 2001).
It appears that the mattering literature has not reached consensus on the components of interpersonal mattering.
We stand for nothing less than a world in which pretend mattering has been rendered obsolete, not just by evidence and logic, but by forms of life that afford well-being, creative fulfillment, and honest-to-goodness mattering for all.
The well-being of sentient creatures is the sole root of real mattering. It matters inherently; other things matter only by enhancing or detracting from it.
Adding the mattering component may seem like a small effort, but it has the potential to be a key in creating an atmosphere where all participants feel welcomed, wanted, and valued.
Mattering Through Advocacy Efforts and School Climate Change
The concept of mattering can be used to help school counselors both identify barriers to academic success and plan diverse solutions for removing them.
This article has provided an overview of Elliott et al.'s (2004) conceptualization and empirical validation of the mattering construct; however, as the attention on mattering in the social sciences grows, it is important for counselors to recognize the possibilities of its use in counseling.
The feeling of being needed, of being significant to others, of mattering, gives meaning to individuals' lives (Amundsen, 1993; Rosenberg & McCullough, 1981).
The present study was undertaken to examine the influence of ethnic identity, acculturation, and mattering on wellness using a sample of 176 minority and 286 nonminority adolescents attending an urban public high school in the Southeast.
The findings for the model for all participants indicated that the three-factor model of ethnic identity, acculturation, and mattering partially predicted wellness in adolescents, with mattering and acculturation predicting the greatest amount of wellness; however, mattering was by far the stronger predictor.