matrix


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matrix

 [ma´triks] (pl. ma´trices) (L.)
1. the intercellular substance of a tissue, as bone matrix, or the tissue from which a structure develops, as hair or nail matrix.
2. a metal or plastic band used to provide proper form to a dental restoration, such as amalgam in a prepared cavity.
Matrices: A, Simple metal strip with a wooden wedge. B, Circumferential band of copper to encase the entire crown. From Baum et al., 1995.
bone matrix the intercellular substance of bone, consisting of collagenous fibers, ground substance, and inorganic salts.
cartilage matrix the intercellular substance of cartilage consisting of cells and extracellular fibers embedded in an amorphous ground substance.
nail matrix (matrix un´guis) the nail bed.

ma·trix

, pl.

ma·tri·ces

(mā'triks, mat'riks; mā'tri-sēz, mat'ri-sēz),
1. The formative portion of a nail.
2. The intercellular substance of a tissue.
3. A surrounding substance within which something is contained or embedded, for example, the fatty tissue in which blood vessels or lymph nodes lie provides a matrix for these embedded structures.
4. A mold in which anything is cast or swaged; a counterdie; an instrument, plastic material, or metal strip specially shaped for holding and shaping the material used to fill a tooth cavity.
5. A rectangular array of numbers or symbol quantities that simplify the execution of linear operations of tedious complexity, for example, the Ito method; the theory of matrices is widely used in solving simultaneous equations and in population genetics.
6. The support or stationary phase in chromatography or zone electrophoresis.
[L. womb; female breeding animal]

matrix

(mā′trĭks)
n. pl. matrices (mā′trĭ-sēz′, măt′rĭ-) or matrixes
1. The womb.
2. Anatomy
a. The formative cells or tissue of a specialized structure such as a hair, nail, claw, or tooth.

matrix

Anatomy
The intercellular substance of a tissue.

Lab medicine
The principal constituents of a material of interest; for blood chemistries, the matrix includes serum, specific proteins and synthetic material.

Molecular biology
A medium on which in which things are formed, developed or embedded.
 
Vox populi
The Matrix, a 1999 science-fiction action film.

matrix

Lab medicine The principal constituents of a material of interest; for blood chemistries, the matrix includes serum, specific proteins, and synthetic material. See Decision matrix, Four cell diagnostic matrix, Job exposure matrix, Interference, Matrix effect, Matrix interference, Scoring matrix.

ma·trix

, pl. matrices (mā'triks, -tri-sēz)
1. The formative portion of a tooth or a nail.
2. The intercellular substance of a tissue.
3. A surrounding substance within which something is contained or embedded.
4. A mold in which anything is cast or swaged; a counterdie; a specially shaped instrument, plastic material, or metal strip used for holding and shaping the material used in filling a tooth cavity.
5. A rectangular array of numbers or symbol quantities that simplify the execution of linear operations of tedious complexity; the theory of matrices is widely used in solving simultaneous equations and in population genetics.
[L. womb; female breeding animal]

matrix

The scaffolding or ground substance of a tissue which supports the specialized functional cells.

matrix

a ground substance in which other materials or cells are embedded; for example, the matrix of CONNECTIVE TISSUE containing fibres, or blood plasma forming a matrix in which are various blood cells. The matrix provides tensile strength and structural integrity, provides substrates for ADHESION and migration of cells, and modulates cell function and DIFFERENTIATION.

Matrix

The tissue at the base of the nail, from which the nail grows.
Mentioned in: Nail Removal

ma·trix

, pl. matrices (mā'triks, -tri-sēz)
1. [TA] A mold in which anything is cast or swaged; material shaped for holding and shaping the material used to fill a tooth cavity.
2. [TA] The formative portion of a nail.
3. The intercellular substance of a tissue.
[L. womb; female breeding animal]
References in periodicals archive ?
He explained that they disclosed the matrix to the public for the plotters to know that the government was putting them on notice that pursuing such plot would open them to prosecution.
The following lemma taken from [12] gives us an integral representation of the Pochhammer matrix symbol.
We define the confluent hypergeometric function with matrix parameters as
Improvement of the Triangular Form of Matrix in the Class of Semiscalarly Equivalent Matrix: Reduced Matrix
If in the matrix A(x) of the form (2) co deg [a.sub.1] = co deg [a.sub.3] [not equal to] +[infinity], then A(x) [approximately equal to] B(x), where in the matrix B(x) of the form (2) co deg [b.sub.1] > co deg [b.sub.3], co deg [b.sub.2] = co deg [a.sub.2], co deg [b.sub.3] = co deg [a.sub.3].
(iii) In denotes the identity matrix, i.e., the n x n matrix diag(0, 0, ..., 0).
(iv) An n x n matrix A is called invertible if there exists an n x n matrix B such that AB = BA = [I.sub.n].
A method for designing the measurement matrix is proposed in [10].
The chaotic sequence has the property of pseudorandom, so it can be used for constructing the measurement matrix [15].
is a diagonal matrix, where [a.sub.i] [not equal to] 0 for all i = 1, 2, ..., r and [a.sub.j-1] | [a.sub.j] (divides) for all j = 2, ..., r.
We denote by [??] = [A B] [member of] [R.sup.mx(n+k)] the augmented matrix of (3); this is the matrix obtained from A by adding matrix B.
It is easily shown that the general coupled discrete-time periodic matrix equations (1.4) over the generalized reflexive matrixes are equivalent to the following general coupled matrix equations