mating

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mat·ing

(māt'ing),
The pairing of male and female for the purpose of reproduction.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mating

The pairing of male and female organisms for reproduction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mat·ing

(māt'ing)
The pairing of male and female for the purpose of reproduction.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mating

  1. any reproduction involving two sexes.
  2. (in lower organisms) reproduction between types that differ in physiology but not in physical form.
  3. (in birds and mammals) the behavioural process of pair-formation rather than of copulation leading to sexual reproduction.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Patient discussion about mating

Q. My partner and I have been trying to have a baby? But it have not happen yet, what can we do different. What can I do to find out to make sure that I can have kids?

A. The best way to tell if you can have children or not is by seeing your doctor. Hope this helps.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Outbred st males appear to have near-normal mating ability (L.
Complete sterility, however, would lead to a score of 0 for mating ability. There is thus some possibility of confounding sterility with mating success in this assay.
Because mating ability was assayed at two different ages, genetic variance at early and late ages can be compared (by a t-test or Wilcoxon sign-rank test).
These correlations suggest that flies with high mean longevity tend to have low baseline mortality rates and high mating ability at 3 wk of age.
Analysis of variance (SAS GLM procedure, SAS, 1990) was used to evaluate the results of the noncompetitive mating experiments, and the results of the experiments designed to assay recovery of mating ability. Selection regime, age, and recovery period were treated as fixed effects.
Recovery of mating ability after noncompetitive mating tests as a function of age and selection regime and as a function of age and recovery period is shown in Figures 2a and 3a, respectively.
Evolution of increased longevity (Rose, 1984; Service, 1989) and improved late-age mating ability in the O populations has resulted in decreased early-age competitive mating ability relative to the B population controls (Table 1).
However, this seems unlikely in view of the above mentioned absence of differences between the youngest B and O males in noncompetitive mating ability and in post-recovery progeny production.