maternal

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maternal

 [mah-ter´nal]
pertaining to the female parent.
maternal deprivation syndrome failure to thrive with severe growth retardation, unresponsiveness to the environment, depression, retarded mental and emotional development, and behavioral problems as a result of loss, absence, or neglect of the mother or other primary caregiver.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ma·ter·nal

(mă-ter'năl),
Relating to or derived from the mother.
[L. maternus, fr. mater, mother]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

maternal

(mə-tûr′nəl)
adj.
1. Relating to or characteristic of a mother or motherhood; motherly: maternal instinct.
2. Inherited from one's mother: a maternal trait.
3. Related through one's mother: my maternal uncle.

ma·ter′nal·ism n.
ma·ter′nal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

maternal

adjective
(1) Referring to a mother; motherly.
(2) Referring to a woman who has given birth.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

hydrops fetalis

Kernicterus, Rh incompatibility, Rh-induced hemolytic disease of newborn Obstetrics An accumulation of fluid in neonates, resulting in a 'puffy', plethoric or hydropic appearance that may be due to various etiologies Clinical Ascites, edema, ↓ protein or chronic intrauterine anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, cardiomegaly, extramedullary hematopoiesis, jaundice, pallor COD Heart failure. See Hemolytic disease of the newborn.
Hydrops Fetalis, causes
Immune Mother produces IgG antibodies against infant antigen(s), often an RBC antigen, most commonly, anti-RhD, which then passes into the fetal circulation, causing hemolysis
Non-immune Hydrops may result from various etiologies including
•  Fetal origin, eg congenital heart disease (premature foramen ovale closure, large AV septal defect), hematologic (erythroblastosis fetalis, α-thalassemia due to hemoglobin Barts, chronic fetomaternal or twin-twin transfusion), infection (CMV, herpesvirus, rubella, sepsis, toxoplasma), pulmonary (cystic adenomatoid malformation, diaphragmatic hernia, with pulmonary hypoplasia, lymphangiectasia), renal (vein thrombosis, congenital nephrosis) and teratomas, skeletal malformations (achondroplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta, fetal neuroblastomatosis, storage disease, meconium peritonitis, idiopathic)
•  Placental Chorangioma, umbilical or chorionic vein thrombosis
 Maternal DM, toxemia  
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ma·ter·nal

(mă-tĕr'năl)
Relating to or derived from the mother.
[L. maternus, fr. mater, mother]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Maternal

From one's mother.
Mentioned in: Prader-Willi Syndrome
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Buckle characterizes herself as maternalistic and patronizing, as well as victimized.
Haney's exhaustive treatise begins with a premise that the essential characteristics of the Hungarian welfare state have morphed three times during a 50 year period, from a regime type she terms Welfare Society (1948-1968) to a Maternalistic model (1968-1985) and final to a Liberal incarnation (1985-1996).
these poor women with a maternalistic sense of pity, advocating public
Supposedly the distaff upper class in countries such as England are used to servants and know how to socialize with them in "maternalistic" ways that keep life pleasant even as they bolster labor discipline and class boundaries.
("The artistic director gratifies his special need to relate to people in a highly accentuated paternalistic and maternalistic fashion," says the inimitable Dr.
-- The government of the "bad old days" was paternalistic, whereas the present kind of Western government may be called maternalistic. The old power was harsh and visible, modern power soft and all-pervasive.
a way of life, a monastery, a prison--farm--factory--workshop--laboratory --studio--chapel--nursery--hospital--a place where books are written, pictures made, prayers said, lives are begun and ended." As conductor of this "symphony," she drew on the "maternalistic rhetoric" of the female reform "Ation, determined to offer social service rather than punishment to the women in her care.
Although children's book editorship, especially in McElderry's tradition, does often involve maternalistic and nurturing elements, as we shall discuss, many of the matriarchal figures who pioneered the profession were anything but maternal.
Most of the participants of this study articulated who they are and what they do within a maternalistic discourse.
She is equally critical of a model that features informed consent and patient autonomy exclusively, as it ignores the physician's autonomy and professional obligation "of doing good and avoiding harm to the patient." Mahowald labels this exclusive focus on the patient's self-determination "maternalistic" because the essential task of motherhood is "to foster another human being's developing autonomy ...
In addition, Hans Eysenck has raised the problem of conscience, Tom Tyler that of authority, Barry Schwartz that of markets, and Peggy Reeves Sanday that of maternalistic (or as she calls it, a bit misleadingly, matriarchal) cultures; as will become clear, I have little to say about any of these matters except to raise questions that I feel no one has yet been able to answer, least of afl me.
She seeks a securely colonial, maternalistic relation with Merle, but Merle, rebelling against the "face .