maternal

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maternal

 [mah-ter´nal]
pertaining to the female parent.
maternal deprivation syndrome failure to thrive with severe growth retardation, unresponsiveness to the environment, depression, retarded mental and emotional development, and behavioral problems as a result of loss, absence, or neglect of the mother or other primary caregiver.

ma·ter·nal

(mă-ter'năl),
Relating to or derived from the mother.
[L. maternus, fr. mater, mother]

maternal

/ma·ter·nal/ (mah-ter´nal) pertaining to the mother.

maternal

(mə-tûr′nəl)
adj.
1. Relating to or characteristic of a mother or motherhood; motherly: maternal instinct.
2. Inherited from one's mother: a maternal trait.
3. Related through one's mother: my maternal uncle.

ma·ter′nal·ism n.
ma·ter′nal·ly adv.

maternal (mat, matern.)

[mətur′nəl]
Etymology: L, maternus, motherhood
1 inherited, derived, or received from a mother.
2 motherly in behavior.
3 related through the mother's side of the family, such as a maternal grandfather.

maternal

adjective
(1) Referring to a mother; motherly.
(2) Referring to a woman who has given birth.

hydrops fetalis

Kernicterus, Rh incompatibility, Rh-induced hemolytic disease of newborn Obstetrics An accumulation of fluid in neonates, resulting in a 'puffy', plethoric or hydropic appearance that may be due to various etiologies Clinical Ascites, edema, ↓ protein or chronic intrauterine anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, cardiomegaly, extramedullary hematopoiesis, jaundice, pallor COD Heart failure. See Hemolytic disease of the newborn.
Hydrops Fetalis, causes
Immune Mother produces IgG antibodies against infant antigen(s), often an RBC antigen, most commonly, anti-RhD, which then passes into the fetal circulation, causing hemolysis
Non-immune Hydrops may result from various etiologies including
•  Fetal origin, eg congenital heart disease (premature foramen ovale closure, large AV septal defect), hematologic (erythroblastosis fetalis, α-thalassemia due to hemoglobin Barts, chronic fetomaternal or twin-twin transfusion), infection (CMV, herpesvirus, rubella, sepsis, toxoplasma), pulmonary (cystic adenomatoid malformation, diaphragmatic hernia, with pulmonary hypoplasia, lymphangiectasia), renal (vein thrombosis, congenital nephrosis) and teratomas, skeletal malformations (achondroplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta, fetal neuroblastomatosis, storage disease, meconium peritonitis, idiopathic)
•  Placental Chorangioma, umbilical or chorionic vein thrombosis
 Maternal DM, toxemia  

ma·ter·nal

(mă-tĕr'năl)
Relating to or derived from the mother.
[L. maternus, fr. mater, mother]

Maternal

From one's mother.
Mentioned in: Prader-Willi Syndrome

maternal

pertaining to the female parent.

maternal antibodies
see maternal antibody and passive immunity.
maternal bond
see dam-offspring bond.
maternal effect
the transitory influence of the mother on the phenotype of her offspring, caused by factors such as milk yield and uterine environment.
maternal neglect
failure of the dam to stay with the neonate, failure to groom it, help it to feed, find it if separated. The extreme degree is desertion. Characteristic of some breeds, e.g. merino ewes. See also mismothering.
maternal nutritional status
body condition of a dam, pregnant or with a neonate at foot; important management feature as insurance for the survival of the offspring.
maternal obstetric paralysis
a common abnormality after a difficult calving, especially in a heifer. It is caused by pressure on peripheral nerves, and manifests itself as weakness, paresthesia in one hindleg, or difficulty or inability to rise. The ligaments, joints and muscles are normal. See also obturator paralysis.
maternal pelvic inlet
the size of the aperture leading from the peritoneal to the pelvic cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The slang expression "nanny state" recognizes this maternalism.
Maternalism was increasingly associated not only with the production of new infants, but also with the patriotic struggle to safeguard the race and enhance its potential for military success.
Liberal individualism and maternalism today reinforce both market libertarianism and the sexual division of caregiving labor within the family.
8) Operating within the Cold War political consensus, the GFWC's postwar maternalism meshed well with the anticommunist political culture.
Kleinberg, 'Mothers and Other Workers: (Re)Conceiving Labor, Maternalism, and the State', Journal of Women's History, 13, no.
Maternalism concomitantly enabled middle-class women reformers to leave home in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and set parameters that constrained the ways in which they worked.
Key Words: maternalism, mistress-maid, class inequality, the Philippines
Maternalism takes the ancient sexist categories that exclude women from the public realm and uses them to win women a hearing there--children, it is generally conceded, are the one subject about which women know a thing or two--but it leaves the categories untouched.
Benevolent maternalism frames disability as "a lack that middle class female benevolence redresses" (103).
In the shape of Daniel's emotional constitution, the novel's psychological line of development disrupts Sir Hugo's professional expectations by invoking some inchoate type of maternalism, as if to suggest that the novel's reproduction of male professional culture produces a great deal of anxiety about female identity and the appropriateness of emotional and psychological concerns to professionalized art forms.
At best, it is a story of a "progressive maternalism," which gained power through the efforts of well-educated upper- and upper-middle class women even before women had gained the vote.
Bussiere suggests in closing, moreover, that "the language of maternalism might have served welfare recipients well," if only those advocating their cause had been willing to make such an appeal (p.

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