maternal

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maternal

 [mah-ter´nal]
pertaining to the female parent.
maternal deprivation syndrome failure to thrive with severe growth retardation, unresponsiveness to the environment, depression, retarded mental and emotional development, and behavioral problems as a result of loss, absence, or neglect of the mother or other primary caregiver.

ma·ter·nal

(mă-ter'năl),
Relating to or derived from the mother.
[L. maternus, fr. mater, mother]

maternal

(mə-tûr′nəl)
adj.
1. Relating to or characteristic of a mother or motherhood; motherly: maternal instinct.
2. Inherited from one's mother: a maternal trait.
3. Related through one's mother: my maternal uncle.

ma·ter′nal·ism n.
ma·ter′nal·ly adv.

maternal

adjective
(1) Referring to a mother; motherly.
(2) Referring to a woman who has given birth.

hydrops fetalis

Kernicterus, Rh incompatibility, Rh-induced hemolytic disease of newborn Obstetrics An accumulation of fluid in neonates, resulting in a 'puffy', plethoric or hydropic appearance that may be due to various etiologies Clinical Ascites, edema, ↓ protein or chronic intrauterine anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, cardiomegaly, extramedullary hematopoiesis, jaundice, pallor COD Heart failure. See Hemolytic disease of the newborn.
Hydrops Fetalis, causes
Immune Mother produces IgG antibodies against infant antigen(s), often an RBC antigen, most commonly, anti-RhD, which then passes into the fetal circulation, causing hemolysis
Non-immune Hydrops may result from various etiologies including
•  Fetal origin, eg congenital heart disease (premature foramen ovale closure, large AV septal defect), hematologic (erythroblastosis fetalis, α-thalassemia due to hemoglobin Barts, chronic fetomaternal or twin-twin transfusion), infection (CMV, herpesvirus, rubella, sepsis, toxoplasma), pulmonary (cystic adenomatoid malformation, diaphragmatic hernia, with pulmonary hypoplasia, lymphangiectasia), renal (vein thrombosis, congenital nephrosis) and teratomas, skeletal malformations (achondroplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta, fetal neuroblastomatosis, storage disease, meconium peritonitis, idiopathic)
•  Placental Chorangioma, umbilical or chorionic vein thrombosis
 Maternal DM, toxemia  

ma·ter·nal

(mă-tĕr'năl)
Relating to or derived from the mother.
[L. maternus, fr. mater, mother]

Maternal

From one's mother.
Mentioned in: Prader-Willi Syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Liberal individualism and maternalism today reinforce both market libertarianism and the sexual division of caregiving labor within the family.
Historian Mary Nash believes that "the social projection of motherhood and maternalism constituted an important characteristic of women's historical experience during the war" (58).
At first, despite his deliberate distance, Kitty tends to her husband with practical maternalism: "I've ordered dinner at seven.
Often these campaigns laced eugenicist discourses together with maternalism in ways that both racialized and classed notions of Canadian motherhood:
(34.) Quoted by American William Hard and cited by Sonya Michel, 'The Limits of Maternalism: Policies Toward American Wage-Earning Mothers during the Progressive Era', in Koven and Michel, Mothers of a New World, p.
with the clay of the land, Scarlett's maturation into maternalism
Nevertheless, honour and self sacrificing maternalism seem to offer a more comfortable logic, a safe option: to think otherwise would be much more challenging.
Long-standing policy ideas such as male breadwinning, female home-making and "maternalism", as well as old style non-liberalist subsidiarity and non-individualizing "relationalism" had to be overcome in order to arrive at the new family policy model that we have seen emerging in recent years.
"Whereas in Lebanese culture maternalism (and paternalism) mandates a high degree of both inclusion and protection, half of the Lebanese employers we interviewed circumscribed the space available in their homes for domestic workers," Abdulrahim added, noting that 43 percent of employers forbade their employees from eating at the same table or from entering the living room while guests were over.
In the context of the scholarship and activism on maternal empowerment such requires that we move from a politic of maternalism to that which Judith Stadtman Tucker perceptively defines as a 'feminist ethic of care' framework:
She notes that in 1920s Australia he encountered a particular macho brand of masculinity which in the novel is overlaid with politics and intimations of homosexuality and male maternalism. She observes that in the holograph draft of the novel there is extensive acknowledgement of same-sex attraction between Somers and Kangaroo, excised from the published version.
Her work focuses on the practise of maternalism by mistresses on servants, as a system of power relations.