maternal-infant transmission

maternal-infant transmission

Epidemiology Transmission of a pathogen from mom to infant. See Vertical transmission. Cf Horizontal transmission.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reduction of maternal-infant transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 with zidovudine treatment.
Trends in maternal-infant transmission of AIDS after antiretroviral therapy in Brazil.
Reduction of maternal-infant transmission of human immunodepficiency virus type 1 with zidovudine treatment.
A key disagreement seems to be whether the reporting problems should invalidate the conclusion from that study that single-dose nevirapine is safe and effective for preventing maternal-infant transmission of HIV.
Although intravenous drug use is the most common transmission route, patients may also acquire the virus via transfusions, high-risk sexual behavior, occupational exposure, unsafe medical practices, infected donor organs from transplant, and maternal-infant transmission.
Maternal-infant transmission is the most frequent route of pediatric infection, while intrafamily spread plays a role, albeit a much smaller one.
3], reduced the risk of maternal-infant transmission by two-thirds.
This second special issue of the Health Education Monograph Series on HIV/AIDS Prevention in Rural Communities presents seven articles: (1) "Preventing Maternal-Infant Transmission of HIV: Social and Ethical Issues" (James G.
Testing breast milk for the presence of LACV also might be reasonable to evaluate the potential for maternal-infant transmission and to determine the suitability for continued breastfeeding.
It is widely believed that the real issue for the government is not the cost of the nevirapine for preventing maternal-infant transmission (which the drug's manufacturer Boehringer Ingelheim has offered free, although the cost of so little nevirapine would not be a baffler in any case), but that once the government provides the drug routinely to HIV-positive pregnant women, there will certainly be more pressure to also treat the mothers, fathers, and others.
The medical advances include 1) surfactant therapy, which improves infant lung maturity, resulting in a decreased risk for death for high-risk preterm infants (3); 2) folic acid consumption by women of childbearing age to reduce the risk for neural tube defects (4); and 3) intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis for women colonized with or at high risk for maternal-infant transmission of group B streptococcal infection (5,6).