maternal

(redirected from maternal antibodies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

maternal

 [mah-ter´nal]
pertaining to the female parent.
maternal deprivation syndrome failure to thrive with severe growth retardation, unresponsiveness to the environment, depression, retarded mental and emotional development, and behavioral problems as a result of loss, absence, or neglect of the mother or other primary caregiver.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ma·ter·nal

(mă-ter'năl),
Relating to or derived from the mother.
[L. maternus, fr. mater, mother]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

maternal

(mə-tûr′nəl)
adj.
1. Relating to or characteristic of a mother or motherhood; motherly: maternal instinct.
2. Inherited from one's mother: a maternal trait.
3. Related through one's mother: my maternal uncle.

ma·ter′nal·ism n.
ma·ter′nal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

maternal

adjective
(1) Referring to a mother; motherly.
(2) Referring to a woman who has given birth.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

hydrops fetalis

Kernicterus, Rh incompatibility, Rh-induced hemolytic disease of newborn Obstetrics An accumulation of fluid in neonates, resulting in a 'puffy', plethoric or hydropic appearance that may be due to various etiologies Clinical Ascites, edema, ↓ protein or chronic intrauterine anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, cardiomegaly, extramedullary hematopoiesis, jaundice, pallor COD Heart failure. See Hemolytic disease of the newborn.
Hydrops Fetalis, causes
Immune Mother produces IgG antibodies against infant antigen(s), often an RBC antigen, most commonly, anti-RhD, which then passes into the fetal circulation, causing hemolysis
Non-immune Hydrops may result from various etiologies including
•  Fetal origin, eg congenital heart disease (premature foramen ovale closure, large AV septal defect), hematologic (erythroblastosis fetalis, α-thalassemia due to hemoglobin Barts, chronic fetomaternal or twin-twin transfusion), infection (CMV, herpesvirus, rubella, sepsis, toxoplasma), pulmonary (cystic adenomatoid malformation, diaphragmatic hernia, with pulmonary hypoplasia, lymphangiectasia), renal (vein thrombosis, congenital nephrosis) and teratomas, skeletal malformations (achondroplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta, fetal neuroblastomatosis, storage disease, meconium peritonitis, idiopathic)
•  Placental Chorangioma, umbilical or chorionic vein thrombosis
 Maternal DM, toxemia  
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ma·ter·nal

(mă-tĕr'năl)
Relating to or derived from the mother.
[L. maternus, fr. mater, mother]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Maternal

From one's mother.
Mentioned in: Prader-Willi Syndrome
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Passive transfer of maternal antibodies to West Nile virus in flamingo chicks (Phoenicopterus chilensis and Phoenicopterus ruber ruber).
This cohort study was conducted to understand the dynamics of EV71-specific maternal antibodies in young infants in Taiwan.
From this curve, we calculated the half-life of maternal antibodies to CHIKV in infants to be 35.5 days.
The antibodies may be due to passive immunity transferred by a parent; however, this crow was around 2.5 months old, and the duration of maternal antibodies may not last this long.
At birth, maternal antibodies protect infants from dengue infection.
The results showed that 44.0% of mothers had antibodies to HEV71 (deduced from antibody prevalence in cord blood), which waned rapidly so that after 1 month, none of the children tested had maternal antibodies to HEV71 (Figure 1).
The second aspect is to determine the percentage of infants aged below nine months with protective maternal antibodies.
This transfer enables maternal antibodies to attack the red blood cells of the fetus, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality.
Poor nutrition can interfere with a healthy immune response, and maternal antibodies passed to kittens through either the placenta during gestation or in milk during nursing can interfere with the development of immunity after vaccination.
While maternal antibodies against some diseases such as measles can be transferred from mother to infant, providing some protection until the child is old enough for individual vaccination, antibodies to other serious diseases like polio are less efficiently transferred.
Puppies receive maternal antibodies through the colostrum the first 12 to 24 hours after birth.

Full browser ?