masticatory force


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Related to masticatory force: gnathodynamometer

force of mas·ti·ca·tion

the motive force created by the dynamic action of the muscles during the physiologic act of mastication.

force of mas·ti·ca·tion

(fōrs mas'ti-kā'shŭn)
The force created by the action of the muscles during mastication.
Synonym(s): masticatory force.

force of mas·ti·ca·tion

(fōrs mas'ti-kā'shŭn)
Motive force created by dynamic action of muscles during physiologic act of mastication.
Synonym(s): biting strength, chewing force, masticatory force.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lifetime of a buried implant is evaluated by two phases as masticatory forces are applied: the unloaded healing phase and functional phase.
The above was followed by standardization of the measurements of facial morphology, masticatory force and transverse dimensions, with two evaluators, in a pilot sample of 20 patients treated at the Institucion Universitaria Colegios de Colombia (UNICOC) Orthodontic Clinic (Cali), obtaining an intraclass correlation index greater than 0.85 for all the measurements under study; this means that the obtained value shows good inter-observer agreement.
A total of 196 preteens from three ethnic groups (mestizo, African descent and indigenous) between 12 and 14 years of age provided information on clinical measurements such as masticatory force, transverse measurements of dental arches, nasion (N) to gnation (Gn) measurements, and measurements from right zygomatic point (rZ) to left zygomatic point (lZ).
This work aimed at evaluating the stress distribution in the cervical region of a sound upper central incisor in two clinical situations: maximum intercuspation simulating standard and maximum masticatory forces.
Dimorphism in mandible is obviously reflected in its shape and size, and the expression of mandibular dimorphism is, certainly, influenced by the relative development of muscles of mastication, as masticatory forces exerted are different for males and females (Franklin et al.).
Stress distribution around teeth and masticatory forces involving periodontal tissue and replacing dental material is a quite debated topic in the recent literature [1, 4, 7, 15-22].
Consequently different biomechanical forces (masticatory forces) affect teeth, jawbones, temporomandibular joints, as well as the AEI, and the entire craniofacial system.
From our findings, the mean description of subjects showed that occlusal vertical dimension and mandibular bone height increase with increasing age up to age 25, after which there was a slight decline; this may be attributable to reduced growth after immediate postpubertal ages, and increasing masticatory forces in older age groups.
The microdamage and microfractures that occur either physiologically as the result of the constant stress of masticatory forces or pathologically as the result of local infections and dental extractions cannot be repaired.
Nevertheless, all the limitations that involve in vitro studies should be taken into consideration, such as the presence of masticatory forces, tooth movement during orthodontic treatment and biological factors involved, such as the presence of bacterial plaque and acquired pellicle.
It is suggested that after six months of NSCH application, this softer, less stiff dentine may be less able to withstand masticatory forces, making the dentine more prone to fracture.
The reconstructed crown will be more stable and will be able to endure masticatory forces in function [10].