masseter

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mas·se·ter (mus·cle)

[TA]
masticatory muscle of posterior cheek; origin, superficial part: inferior border of the anterior two thirds of the zygomatic arch; deep part: inferior border and medial surface of the zygomatic arch; insertion, lateral surface of ramus and coronoid process of the mandible; action, elevates mandible (closes jaw); nerve supply, masseteric branch of mandibular division of trigeminal.
Synonym(s): musculus masseter [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

masseter

(mə-sē′tər, mă-)
n.
A thick muscle in the cheek that closes the jaws during chewing.

mas′se·ter′ic (măs′ĭ-tĕr′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

masseter

The major jaw muscle, which participates in protraction, retraction and side to side movement of the jaw.

Action
Closes jaw.
 
Nerve
Mandibular branch of trigeminal.

Origin, superficial part
Zygomatic process of maxilla, inferior border of zygomatic arch.
 
Origin, deep part
Inferior border and medial suface of zygomatic arch.
 
Insertion, superficial part
Angle, ramus of mandible.
 
Insertion, deep part
Superior ramus, lateral coronoid process of mandible.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

masseter

A short, thick, paired muscle in each cheek running down from the cheekbone (zygomatic arch) to the outer corner of the jawbone (mandible). The masseters act to raise the lower jaw and compress the teeth together in the act of chewing.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

masseter

the chewing muscle which raises the lower jaw.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The matter is often complicated by the one-sided contraction of the masseter muscle that changes the rest position of the mandible, often making it impossible to determine the central relation [2].
The facial NEMG values of the masseter muscle were significantly greater at a workload of 200 W compared with those at the other four power outputs; however, they were not significantly different between 160 W and 120 W or between 80 W and 40 W.
For example, a patient presenting with pain in the TMJ and masseter muscle could be seen by a chiropractor as a TMD, but a dentist would check to be sure the patient's teeth were not abscessed before diagnosing a TMD.
Acute effects of kinesiotaping on muscular endurance and fatigue by using surface electromyography signals of masseter muscle. Med Sport.
In this study, with the use of a neuromuscular reprogramming device producing a programmed contact of the anterior teeth for the specific time periods proposed by the study, we observed the highest electromyographic values in relation to the resting position at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 minutes for the left temporalis and right masseter muscles; at 0 min for the left masseter muscle; and at 5 and 30 minutes for the right temporalis muscle in normal subjects.
However, notice that the temporalis muscles are contracting 2 1ua2 times greater levels than the masseter muscles. Soon after a reposi- tioning appliance was placed that balanced both the muscle and the forces, the headaches were relieved.
Ag/AgCl electrodes with centre-to-centre distance 24 mm were placed longitudinally along bellies of the right and left masseter muscles. The aim of using both muscles was to double the sample size easily.
Dependent measures included: heart rate, body temperature, electrodermal activity (sweating), and facial muscle tension (frontalis and masseter muscles).
According to Donald Marks, D.D.S., who has many years of experience with the New York University College of Dentistry and the Manhattan Veterans Affairs Medical Center, TMD has three basic causes: malocculsions or improper wisdom tooth alignment; anatomical problems may exist and the joint itself could be misaligned; or stress may lead to muscle spasm and grinding, causing the internal and external pterygoid and masseter muscles to go into spasm-causing pain.