masseter


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Related to masseter: buccinator, temporalis, Medial pterygoid

mas·se·ter (mus·cle)

[TA]
masticatory muscle of posterior cheek; origin, superficial part: inferior border of the anterior two thirds of the zygomatic arch; deep part: inferior border and medial surface of the zygomatic arch; insertion, lateral surface of ramus and coronoid process of the mandible; action, elevates mandible (closes jaw); nerve supply, masseteric branch of mandibular division of trigeminal.
Synonym(s): musculus masseter [TA]

masseter

(mə-sē′tər, mă-)
n.
A thick muscle in the cheek that closes the jaws during chewing.

mas′se·ter′ic (măs′ĭ-tĕr′ĭk) adj.

masseter

The major jaw muscle, which participates in protraction, retraction and side to side movement of the jaw.

Action
Closes jaw.
 
Nerve
Mandibular branch of trigeminal.

Origin, superficial part
Zygomatic process of maxilla, inferior border of zygomatic arch.
 
Origin, deep part
Inferior border and medial suface of zygomatic arch.
 
Insertion, superficial part
Angle, ramus of mandible.
 
Insertion, deep part
Superior ramus, lateral coronoid process of mandible.

masseter

A short, thick, paired muscle in each cheek running down from the cheekbone (zygomatic arch) to the outer corner of the jawbone (mandible). The masseters act to raise the lower jaw and compress the teeth together in the act of chewing.

masseter

the chewing muscle which raises the lower jaw.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical and radiographic examination revealed that facial asymmetry developed due to benign hypertrophy of the left masseter muscle.
I developed nighttime teeth-grinding in my mid-20s and it worked out my masseters over time.
These two variables had a size component and indicate the development of the masseter muscle in these piscivorous species being gradual to the insectivorous Myotis to piscivoros Myotis and Noctilio.
Mitchel et al stated that pain in the joint demonstrates joint or capsule inflammation or adhesions while pain in the masseter or temporalis may demonstrates trigger points or hypertonicity of the closing muscles.15 Velly et al18 noted that self-reported tooth clenching/grinding was associated with the prevalence of chronic masticatory myofascial pain.
Despite being known for cosmetic use in the reduction of hyperkinetic facial lines, it can also be used for therapeutic purposes in cases of bruxism, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, masseter hypertrophy and severe gingival exposure (1, 4-11).
The matter is often complicated by the one-sided contraction of the masseter muscle that changes the rest position of the mandible, often making it impossible to determine the central relation [2].
Masseter hypertrophy (MH) is an uncommon condition that can cause aesthetic and functional problems.
Where is the masseter muscle, the strongest muscle of the body, located?
Electrpmyogrphic study of activity of de masseter and anterior temporalis muscles in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction: Comparison with the clinical dysfunction index.
Spastic movement disorders such as cerebral palsy frequently lead to bruxism with masseter muscle hypertonia.
The masseter muscle is the second strongest in the body, second only to the uterine muscle.
The areas of pain reported are in the region of masseter, temporalis, and lower border of the mandible near the molar area and in the ear or TMJ region [Table 1].