mask

(redirected from masks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

mask

 [mask]
1. a covering for the face, as a bandage, an apparatus for administering anesthesia or oxygen, or a cloth that prevents droplets from the mouth and nose from spreading in the air.
A standard face mask. From Lammon et al., 1996.
2. to cover or conceal, as the masking of the nature of a disorder by unassociated signs or organisms.
3. in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
mask of pregnancy popular term for melasma gravidarum.
Venturi mask see venturi mask.

mask

(mask),
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in association with certain diseases; for example, Parkinson facies.
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.

mask

(măsk)
n.
1. A covering for the nose and mouth that is used for inhaling oxygen or an anesthetic.
2. A covering worn over the nose and mouth, as by a surgeon or dentist, to prevent infection.
3. A facial bandage.
4. Any of various conditions producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
5. An expressionless appearance of the face seen in certain diseases, such as parkinsonism.
v.
To cover with a protective mask.

mask

Audiology
verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another.
 
Forensics
See Progressive purple mask of death.
 
Infectious control
noun A typically disposable personal protection device that covers the nose and mouth to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a patient to a healthcare worker, or vice versa.

Neurology
See Mask-like facies.
 
Psychology
noun A outward concealment of wishes or needs, often as an ego defence.

mask

Audiology verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another Infectious control noun A usually disposable personal protection device that covers the nose to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a Pt to a health care worker–HCW or from an HCW to a Pt. See Isolation, Personal protection garment, Reverse isolation Psychology Barrier A concealment of wishes or needs, often as a ego defense.

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in certain diseases (e.g., Parkinson facies).
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of aseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.
See also: mission-oriented protective posture, gas mask

masking

A term describing any process whereby a detectable stimulus is made difficult or impossible to detect by the presentation of a second stimulus (called the mask). The main stimulus (typically called the target) may appear at the same time as the mask (simultaneous masking); or it may precede the mask (backward masking; example: metacontrast); or it may follow the mask (forward masking; example: paracontrast).

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of facial skin.
2. Expressionless appearance seen in association with some diseases, e.g., Parkinson facies.
3. Facial bandage.
4. Shield designed to cover mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. Device designed to cover mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.
References in classic literature ?
"Very good, very good." And immediately, making the king get out of the carriage, he led him, still accompanied by Porthos, who had not taken off his mask, and Aramis, who again resumed his, up the stairs, to the second Bertaudiere, and opened the door of the room in which Philippe for six long years had bemoaned his existence.
Originating from Asia, facial sheet masks have proliferated across the globe in recent years and the total market was valued at $268 million last year, according to Zion Market Research.
The Physicality of the Other: Masks from the Ancient Near East and the Eastern Mediterranean
No product has been more popular than sheet masks, because what's not to love about a supercharged, face-shaped sheet that gives you an mega dose of hydration in a matter of minutes, with no effort required?
No product has been more popular than sheet masks, because what's not to love asupercharged, face-shaped sheet that gives you an mega dose of hydration in a matter minutes, with no effort required?
As part of a schoolwide initiative to study western Africa, I wanted to plan an exploration of African masks that not only highlighted the variety and beauty of the art form, but also opened my students' eyes to the perspectives and experiences of the African people.
Neha Rawla, Brand Communication for Forest Essentials elaborates that just as the origins of most beauty rituals can be traced back to the Indian subcontinent, so can be the origin of the application of face masks, also known as Lepana in Sanskrit.
Here, traditional craft masters make the masks, which can be purchased at tent stalls near the festival's main stage.
One of the key advantages of using frisket films is their ability to create lasting and reusable masks without leaving any residue, even on hot press surfaces.
Face masks are a great way to cleanse, hydrate and restore that natural glow.
Gas-proof clothing began to be manufactured and animal lovers looked at ways to keep their pets safe and there were gas masks available for dogs and horses.