masking

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mask·ing

(mask'ing),
1. The use of noise of any kind to interfere with the audibility of another sound. For any given intensity, low-pitched tones have a greater masking effect than those of a high pitch.
2. In audiology, the use of a noise applied to one ear while testing the hearing of the other ear.
3. The hiding of smaller rhythms in the brain wave record by larger and slower ones, the waveform of which they distort.
4. In dentistry, an opaque covering used to camouflage the metal parts of a prosthesis.
5. In radiography, superimposition of an altered positive image on the original negative to produce an enhanced copy photographically.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

masking

(măs′kĭng)
n.
Physiology The concealment or screening of one sensory process or sensation by another.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

masking

Evidence-based medicine
See Blinding.

Structural biology
Filtering, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mask·ing

(mask'ing)
1. The use of noise of any kind to interfere with the audibility of another sound. For any given intensity, low-pitched tones have a greater masking effect than those of a high pitch.
2. audiology Application of a noise to one ear while testing the hearing acuity of the other ear.
3. The hiding of smaller rhythms in the brain wave record by larger and slower ones the wave form of which they distort.
4. dentistry An opaque covering used to camouflage the metal parts of a prosthesis.
5. radiography Superimposition of an altered positive image on the original negative to produce an enhanced copy photographically.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

masking

A term describing any process whereby a detectable stimulus is made difficult or impossible to detect by the presentation of a second stimulus (called the mask). The main stimulus (typically called the target) may appear at the same time as the mask (simultaneous masking); or it may precede the mask (backward masking; example: metacontrast); or it may follow the mask (forward masking; example: paracontrast).
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

mask·ing

(mask'ing)
1. In dentistry, an opaque covering used to camouflage the metal parts of a prosthesis.
2. In radiography, superimposition of an altered positive image on the original negative to produce an enhanced copy photographically.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012