masculinity


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masculinity

 [mas″ku-lin´ĭ-te]
the possession of masculine qualities.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mas·cu·lin·i·ty

(mas'kyū-lin'i-tē),
Male qualities and characteristics.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

masculinity

The quality or state of being masculine.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mas·cu·lin·i·ty

(mas'kyū-lin'i-tē)
The qualities and characteristics of a male.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Thanks to this trend, the traditional definition of 'masculinity' is increasingly being seen as a narrow concept.
Overall, Imhoff aptly weaves together these two complex agendas: the making of Judaism into a "good" and "manly" religion and the construction of Jewish masculinity. At times, though, these two agendas seem uneasily thrust together.
Structurally, the story oscillates between two settings, Copacabana and Sao Goncalo, revealing two perspectives on Afro-Brazilian masculinity: one is the viewpoint of white, upper- and middle-class residents of Rio's most famous beach neighborhood, and the second is the viewpoint of a predominantly black neighborhood on the outskirts of the city.
"Popular understandings of masculinity during most of the 20th century were largely about the idea that masculinity was a very narrowly defined gender identity," Mercer says.
Given the glorification of the male body, maleness, masculinity, and male sexuality in romance novels, it is somewhat surprising that critical studies of men and masculinities have yet to take a serious interest in these novels.
If men who feel their masculinity is threatened are willing to exaggerate their height or the number of their previous relationships, those who feel that way at work because of negative feedback or evaluations may be equally willing to behave unethically--for example, stretching performance numbers--to reassert themselves.
While each chapter lays out an interesting argument regarding representations of masculinity in turn-of-the-century cinema, trying to chart out a solid body of text to which Millennial Masculinity as a whole is responding is somewhat difficult.
It is important to establish that masculinity is not reduced to the male body and that women can also perform masculinity (Halberstam 1998).
Basso's text is broken into three parts, "Defining Whiteness and Working-Class Masculinity, 1882-1940," "Copper Men and the Challenges of the Early War Home Front," and "Making the Home Front Social Order." The first part examines the dynamics of gender and, as Basso terms them, racial-ethnic identities as they were locally constructed.
Keywords: adolescent men, masculinity, anorexia nervosa, construction of subjectivity