masculine

(redirected from masculines)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

masculine

 [mas´ku-lin]
having qualities usually associated with the male sex.

mas·cu·line

(mas'kyū-lin),
Relating to or marked by the characteristics of the male sex or gender.
Synonym(s): male (2) , masculinus
[L. masculus, male, fr. mas, male]

masculine

(măs′kyə-lĭn)
adj.
1. Of or relating to men or boys; male.
2. Characterized by or possessing qualities traditionally attributed to men, such as aggressiveness.
3. Grammar Relating or belonging to the gender of words or forms that refer chiefly to males or to things grammatically classified as male.
4. Music Ending on an accented beat: a masculine cadence.
n.
1. Grammar
a. The masculine gender.
b. A word or word form of the masculine gender.
2. A male person.

mas′cu·line·ly adv.
mas′cu·line·ness, mas′cu·lin′·ity (-lĭn′ĭ-tē) n.

masculine

adjective Referring to, characterised by or attributed to men or maleness.

mas·cu·line

(mas'kyū-lin)
Relating to or marked by the characteristics of the male sex or gender.
Synonym(s): male (2) .
[L. masculus, male, fr. mas, male]
References in periodicals archive ?
A femininity score (the mean of the respondent's feminine items) and a masculinity score (the mean of his/her masculine items) were determined for each respondent.
As can be seen, overall 39.2 percent of the female respondents were classified as masculine (high masculine, low feminine; i.e., sex reversed) with another 11.8 percent androgynous (high masculine, high feminine).
Approximately one in three females in the current study reported high femininity scores (23.5% feminine (high feminine, low masculine) and 11.8% androgynous (high feminine, high masculine)) as compared to 60 percent in the Bay et al.
With regard to the sex-role groupings of male respondents, 44 percent reported high masculinity scores with 24 percent classed as masculine and 20 percent as androgynous, very similar to the results in the Bay et al.
At the assistant and associate ranks, a higher percentage of females (35.3% assistant, 54.2% associate) were identified as masculine than of males (27.3% assistant, 28.6% associate) with this trend reversed at the full professor level.
Masculine females indicated a much higher level of satisfaction with the nature of their work (46.05) than any other gender-sex-role combination with masculine males reporting the lowest level of satisfaction (35.50).
For the female academicians, assistant professors regardless of sex-role characteristics generally reported higher satisfaction with the nature of their work (masculine 47.5; feminine 39.6; androgynous 45.0; undifferentiated 37.2.) In fact, masculine female assistant professors had the highest level of satisfaction with the nature of their work than another other sex-role-gender-rank combination (47.5).
For males, satisfaction with work was lowest at the full professor level for three sex-role classifications (masculine 31.0, feminine 39.0, androgynous 35.4).
Feminine males reported much higher levels of satisfaction with supervision than any other gender-sex-role category (46.06) with masculine females reporting the lowest (34.20).
For the female accounting academicians, masculine and androgynous full professors together with androgynous assistant professors reported an extremely high level of satisfaction with their supervision (all had a mean JDI index of 51.0).
For both masculine and feminine males, satisfaction levels increased as rank increased (masculine 37.0, 39.5, 44.0; feminine 42.75, 46.88, 47.4).
Masculine males reported essentially a balanced attitude toward their co-workers (27.75), the lowest among the gender-sex-role groups, while feminine males reported the highest level of co-worker satisfaction (37.94).