marsupial


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mar·su·pi·al

(mar-sū'pē-ăl),
1. A member of the order Marsupalia, which includes such mammals as kangaroos, wombats, bandicoots, and opossums, the female of which has an abdominal pouch for carrying the young.
2. Of or pertaining to marsupials.
[L. marsupium, a pouch]

marsupial

(mär-so͞o′pē-əl)
n.
Any of various nonplacental mammals of the infraclass Metatheria, including kangaroos, opossums, bandicoots, and wombats, found principally in Australia and the Americas, and typically bearing young that suckle and develop after birth in the mother's pouch. These species were formerly placed in the order Marsupialia.
adj.
1. Of or belonging to the infraclass Metatheria.
2. Relating to or having a marsupium.

marsupial

adjective Referring to a pouch.

noun Any pouched mammal of the order Marsupialia.

marsupial

any member of the subclass Marsupialia (also called Didelphia or Metatheria) containing mammals characterized by the absence of a placenta and the presence of a pouch to which the young, born in an undeveloped state, migrate during early development. The pouch contains the mammary glands, which vary in number between species, and the young complete their development here. The group was at one time widespread, but now is restricted to Australasia and South America. In Australasia, marsupials, free from competition from EUTHERIAN (placental) mammals, have radiated to occupy most niches elsewhere occupied by placental forms.

marsupial

an animal member of the order Marsupiala, infraclass Metatheria, which produces viviparous young by hatching eggs internally. The bean-sized fetus is transferred to the characteristic marsupial pouch on the anterior abdomen with its mammary gland and reared there. Two monotremes, the platypus and the spiny anteater, lay and hatch eggs and rear the young, the latter in rudimentary marsupial pouches.

carnivorous marsupial
References in periodicals archive ?
The black-eared opossum Didelphis aurita (Wied-Neuwied, 1826) is one of the largest marsupials in Brazil (Gardner 2007).
dimidiata are smaller than this marsupial (Busch and Kravetz, 1991), only Oxymycterus rufus (= O.
In addition to continuing to investigate the similarities and differences between rodents and marsupials, the team is also using these insights from biological whisker sensing to develop animal-like robots that can use artificial whiskers to navigate without vision.
In the July PLoS Biology, the team presents a new marsupial family tree with slightly different familial relationships than other research had predicted.
In comparison, South America's marsupial species seem much less diverse to the untrained eye.
The Tasmanian devil, the world's largest surviving marsupial carnivore, has been listed as "endangered" in Australia as a contagious facial cancer threatens to wipe out the entire wild population.
Why might a mother marsupial need to carry her baby in a pouch?
The Tasmanian devil is the world's largest marsupial carnivore and now can only be found in Australia's southern island state.
Other marsupials include wallabies, koalas, and opossums--the only marsupial found in North America.
The marsupial bones, os marsupalia, form part of the pelvic attachments for abdominal muscles.
Looney Tunes character Taz - a whirling, growling rival to Bugs Bunny - is based on the Aussie marsupial, which is being threatened by contagious cancer.