cowslip

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cowslip

(kou′slĭp′)
n.
1. A Eurasian primrose (Primula veris) having fragrant yellow flowers, widely cultivated as an ornamental and long used in herbal medicine.
2. See marsh marigold.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A perennial herb, the flowers and roots of which contain flavonoids, glycosides, and saponins; it is analgesic, antispasmodic, diuretic, expectorant, laxative, and sedative. It has been used internally for arthritis, headache, insomnia, measles, paralysis, respiratory tract infections, and restlessness, and topically for sunburns
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Indeed, marsh marigold (as its moniker suggests) grows in places where frogs can be found.
Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris) Mature leaves and flowers are poisonous.
Make ponds more interesting by adding new plants like water lilies or marginals such as marsh marigolds or bog irises.
Marsh Marigold and Jamie Goldstein got the better of a ding-dong battle with Skelton Sovereign in the handicap hurdle, giving Joe Fierro a welcome boost in the process.
Good plants to put around a wildlife pond include Caltha palustris (marsh marigold) and Geum rivale (water avens), to encourage waterside insects, along with reedy-stemmed plants to attract dragonflies to lay their eggs.
Also, many native perennials such as marsh marigold and primrose are very attractive and easily established in the garden.
Caltha palustris (Marsh marigold) This British native is happiest with its feet in water, growing alongside ponds and streams, forming a loose mound of leaves and large, waxy buttercups in late spring at the edge of water.
Marsh Marigold may have been a 33-1 chance for the handicap hurdle, but her victory came as no surprise to trainer Joe Fierro.
Renovation of a bog garden proved to be the biggest challenge with the children having to dig out brambles, lay a new liner and introduce a variety of wetland plants including flag iris, marsh marigold and ragged robin.
The roll call included meadow fox-tail, sweet vernal grass, downy oat grass, wood horse-tail, red fescue, crested dog's-tail, wood anemone, bugle, floating sweet grass, sharp flowered rush, ragged robin, wood cranesbill, marsh marigold, globe flower, yellow rattle, adder's tongue fern, and moonwort.
. Marsh marigold, Caltha palustris `Plena' - This is one of the first spring flowers, with double, buttercup-yellow flowers.