marker

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marker

 [mahr´ker]
something that identifies or that is used to identify; see also determinant.
cell-surface marker an antigenic determinant found on the surface of a specific type of cell.
tumor marker a biochemical substance indicative of presence of a tumor; ideally, it should be specific, sensitive, and proportional to tumor load. Called also biomarker.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mark·er

(mark'ĕr),
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, that facilitate linkage analysis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

marker

(mär′kər)
n.
1. A biomarker.
2. A genetic marker.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

marker

Medspeak
A value or indicator of the presence of a disease.

Molecular biology
An identifiable physical location on a chromosome (e.g., restriction enzyme cutting site, gene, minisatellite, microsatellite), the inheritance of which can be monitored. Markers can be an expressed region of DNA (gene encoding a protein) or a segment of DNA with no known coding function but whose pattern of inheritance can be determined. A marker can be localised to a specific region of the genome (e.g., all markers on the human transcript map are STSs).

Markers have also been defined as a genetic trait, of which one allelic form is selected or screened for after recombination. 

Suicidology
A potential physiologic indicator or predictor of an increased risk of suicide, the most promising of which is a decrease in serotonin in the brain.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

marker

Internal medicine A diagnostic indicator for presence of a disease. See Biomarker, Bone marker, Breast marker, Cardiac marker, Cell marker, Cell surface marker, Gene marker, Genetic marker, Kinesic marker, Microsatellite marker, Pan B-cell marker, Pan T-cell marker, Selectable marker, Selected marker, Surface marker, Surrogate marker, Tumor marker.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A characteristic or factor by which a cell or molecule can be recognized or identified.
3. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes that facilitate linkage analysis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

marker

1. A trait, condition, gene, or substance that indicates the presence of, or a probable increased predisposition to, a medical or psychological disorder.
2. A gene whose location on a chromosome is known so that it can be used as a point of reference for MAPPING new mutations.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

marker

see GENETIC MARKER.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

mark·er

(mahrk'ĕr)
1. A device used to make a mark or to indicate measurement.
2. A locus containing two or more alleles that, being harmless, are common and therefore yield high frequencies of heterozygotes, which facilitate linkage analysis
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about marker

Q. what is a safe tumor marker number range?

A. depends on the marker...most of the markers are materials that found normally in our body. and there are a number of markers and their levels differentiate. what marker do you mean?

Q. My wife(53) has elevated CEA and CA19.9 levels - near 150, without any concomitant reason/observation? Comment

A. Hi Bobby3,

The most important question is why were these tests done?
An elevated level may result from many causes, some of them are simple and some are more problematic. IMHO the best thing would be consulting her doctor to consider the need to check-up her alimentary system.
You can read more here (http://www.ascocancerfoundation.org/patient/ASCO+Resources/Patient+Guides/ASCO+Patient+Guide:+Tumor+Markers+for+Gastrointestinal+Cancers) and here (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Detection/tumor-markers)

More discussions about marker
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