marijuana intoxication

marijuana intoxication

The constellation of responses to marijuana use, including a subjective "high", which is an altered state of consciousness characterised by: emotional changes (e.g., mild euphoria and relaxation); perceptual alterations, such as time distortion; and intensification of ordinary sensory experiences, such as when eating, watching films, listening to music or engaging in sex. When used in a social setting, the "high" is often accompanied by infectious laughter, talkativeness, and increased sociability. Cognitive changes are usually marked and include impaired short-term memory and loosening of associations, making it difficult to sustain goal-directed mental activity. Over time, this may lead to amotivational syndrome, in which motor skills, reaction time, co-ordination, and skilled psychomotor activity are impaired.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We argued that the physical evidence at the scene suggested a mechanism of electrocution that did not involve negligence on the part of the decedent, so his potential marijuana intoxication was irrelevant," said plaintiff's attorney Laurence H.
Identifying actual marijuana intoxication by measuring levels of the has been a concern because, unlike alcohol, the persists in a user's body for long periods after intoxication.
How should employers proceed in regards to the use of marijuana and marijuana intoxication on company grounds?
A roadside test for marijuana intoxication? It isn't as easy as it sounds.
Instead of imposing a hard legal limit based on blood THC concentrations, which have too many uncertainties, Huestis proposed training police officers to better recognize the behavioral telltale signs of impairment and marijuana intoxication.
To enforce the law, authorities need a simple, rigorous roadside test for marijuana intoxication. Although several companies are working to develop marijuana breathalyzers, testing a person's breath for marijuana-derived compounds is far more complicated than testing for alcohol.
Until recently, it was more difficult for law enforcement to test for marijuana intoxication. However, some states, like California, have recently unveiled a newer detection system that uses a mobile saliva screening device.
Although there is a high level of heterogeneity regarding quality and findings of studies measuring the association between marijuana use and motor vehicle collision, the most recent systematic reviews and meta-analysis of all related studies indicate an effect of acute marijuana intoxication on motor vehicle crash risk.(4,5) I also agree with Lake and Kerr(2) point that the issues of adolescent usage in Canada may not be a big health concern since the current literature indicates that marijuana is easily accessible among youth in Canada and the current literature does not provide clear evidence on the effect of legalization on the adolescent usage.
At the Forensics@NIST conference in November, Lovestead gave a presentation describing her work to identify other chemical markers indicative of marijuana intoxication. She is focused on creating noninvasive, portable breath tests for A9-THC that can indicate recent marijuana usage from 30 minutes to 2 hours prior--the only real way to determine if a user is driving under the influence of marijuana.
Marijuana intoxication significantly affects motor coordination, reaction time, and judgment, and multiple studies have demonstrated a direct relationship between blood THC concentration and impaired driving ability.
High levels of THC -- in Colorado, a blood concentration of 7.2 ng/ml is deemed marijuana intoxication -- can result in a host of psychological effects.
We also know marijuana intoxication - and any impairment - rapidly diminishes after its use is stopped, although unlike alcohol, it can still be detected in the system up to a month later.