marijuana intoxication

marijuana intoxication

The constellation of responses to marijuana use, including a subjective "high", which is an altered state of consciousness characterised by: emotional changes (e.g., mild euphoria and relaxation); perceptual alterations, such as time distortion; and intensification of ordinary sensory experiences, such as when eating, watching films, listening to music or engaging in sex. When used in a social setting, the "high" is often accompanied by infectious laughter, talkativeness, and increased sociability. Cognitive changes are usually marked and include impaired short-term memory and loosening of associations, making it difficult to sustain goal-directed mental activity. Over time, this may lead to amotivational syndrome, in which motor skills, reaction time, co-ordination, and skilled psychomotor activity are impaired.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of imposing a hard legal limit based on blood THC concentrations, which have too many uncertainties, Huestis proposed training police officers to better recognize the behavioral telltale signs of impairment and marijuana intoxication.
To enforce the law, authorities need a simple, rigorous roadside test for marijuana intoxication.
Until recently, it was more difficult for law enforcement to test for marijuana intoxication.
Although there is a high level of heterogeneity regarding quality and findings of studies measuring the association between marijuana use and motor vehicle collision, the most recent systematic reviews and meta-analysis of all related studies indicate an effect of acute marijuana intoxication on motor vehicle crash risk.
Once relegated to the lab due to the mass spectrometric techniques that traditionally power breathomic tests, the field is now emerging for some fresh air, with researchers increasingly developing portable breathomic devices for everything from diabetes and cancer to marijuana intoxication.
Marijuana intoxication significantly affects motor coordination, reaction time, and judgment, and multiple studies have demonstrated a direct relationship between blood THC concentration and impaired driving ability.
2 ng/ml is deemed marijuana intoxication -- can result in a host of psychological effects.
We also know marijuana intoxication - and any impairment - rapidly diminishes after its use is stopped, although unlike alcohol, it can still be detected in the system up to a month later.
The autopsy, performed 29 hours after time of death, found marijuana intoxication as a chief contributing factor.
There is little literature on synthetic marijuana intoxication.
High doses of the drug invariably result in marijuana intoxication, a condition characterized by increased heart rate, blood-shot eyes, drop in the blood pressure, and muscle tremors.
If you think marijuana intoxication is, on average, a good thing--counting both the happy controlled users and the unhappy dependent users--then a benefit-cost analysis done in a way that reflects your values will probably conclude that legalization improves social welfare.