marginal benefit


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marginal benefit

Medspeak-UK
In economics, a marginal benefit is the value of the additional benefit derived from an extra unit produced.
 
Medspeak-US
The minimal added benefit (e.g., in units of health outcome) produced by using additional resources (e.g., a second intervention).
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As said before, the marginal benefit has two components, one conditional on the loss g not occurring (upper branch) and the other conditional on the loss g occurring (lower branch).
regulation engenders is the primary measure of its marginal benefit.
Because a higher [z.sub.i] implies, ceteris paribus, a higher Z and hence a lower level of [x.sub.i], it follows that at a higher level of preemption, the marginal benefit from preemption is higher.
Unlike dealing with other negative externalities, such as nuclear leakage, the marginal reduction of which produces large social marginal benefits, GHG abatement produces relatively flat marginal benefits.
however, the marginal benefit of increased incentives will tend to get
For some players it is clear that the marginal benefit dwarfed the marginal cost.
Marginal rate of return is then calculated by dividing marginal benefit of each experimental treatment by its marginal cost which then expressed as percentage.
Kirklees proposes to make savings at the expense of the people least able to look after themselves while running a council riddled with political correctness and bureaucracy, employing hundreds and possible thousands of people on high salaries whose services are, at best, of only marginal benefit to the people of Kirklees.
This is marginal benefit incidence of public spending which is rarely determined.
The marginal benefit of using money is greater than the marginal cost of using cash.
Under this assumption, the marginal benefit of avoiding very high future temperatures (which produce large damages and reduce future consumption by large amounts) is bounded, finite, and small.
The independent Appraisal Committee concluded that, because the clinical data showed that there was only a marginal benefit from using the higher dose of liraglutide 1.8mg compared with liraglutide 1.2mg, (and no clinical trial has evaluated the effects of dose escalation with liraglutide from 1.2 mg to 1.8 mg), treatment with the higher dose was not justified.