marfanoid

mar·fan·oid

(mar'fan-oyd),
A term used of those whose phenotype bears a superficial resemblence to that of Marfan syndrome.

marfanoid

adjective Referring to a condition or trait that resembles Marfan syndrome.

mar·fan·oid

(mahr'fă-noyd)
A term used of those whose phenotype bears a superficial resemblance to that of Marfan syndrome.

mar·fan·oid

(mahr'fă-noyd)
A term used to describe those whose phenotype bears a superficial resemblence to that of Marfan syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presentations of this metabolic disorder include developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy, ectopia lentis, myopia, hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, marfanoid habitus, and thromboembolic disorders.[3] These manifestations are often overlooked in the early stage until the occur of thrombotic events like cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST).
Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS), is a syndrome characterized by typical dysmorphic features, craniosynostosis and marfanoid features, skeletal and neurological abnormalities.
At physical evaluation, marfanoid habitus with waxy, sagging skin and varicose veins in the feet was observed.
Target gene sequencing was used to detect the proband and his 8-year-old daughter, both manifesting a marfanoid aortic sinus and tall stature.
Goldsmith, "Bilateral popliteal aneurysms complicating adult polycystic kidney disease in a patient with a marfanoid habitus," Postgraduate Medical Journal, vol.
Another syndrome that should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis is Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome, which includes craniosynostosis, mental retardation, and marfanoid habitus.
MEN2B is associated with an aggressive form of MTC (100.0%; usually incurable if diagnosed [greater than or equal to] 13 yo), PHEO (58.0%), marfanoid habitus, and ganglioneuromatosis of the gut and oral mucosa [57, 59-61].
Subsequently, several anomalies were evidenced: narrow palate, pectus excavatum, recurrent hernias, arachnodactyly, general marfanoid physical aspect, and joint laxity with a high degree of elbow extension, besides cardiac and ocular anomalies.
This correlates with descriptions of untreated or LD HCU patients as being taller and leaner with a "Marfanoid" appearance [1, 2, 18-20], reminiscent of the genetic condition Marfan syndrome.
Marfan's gene was not tested given the pathology finding, absent Marfanoid clinical features, and negative family history.
A 28-year-old man with marfanoid habitus was admitted to our ICU with GBS.
Some marfanoid features were noticed as moderate thoracic kyphoscoliosis, moderate hypermobility of all joints and skin hyperextensibility, positive thumb and wrist signs.