mare


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mare

(mâr)
n.
An adult female horse or the adult female of other equine species.

Patient discussion about mare

Q. my husband suffers from night mares ... is there any kind of treatment that can help him a bit?

A. Although usually no treatment is needed for nightmares, there are several medications that can be used to suppress the kind of sleep that generates nightmares (REM sleep, read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003209.htm ). Among them are the tricyclic antidepre4ssants and benzodiazepines. These medications require prescription so consulting a doctor may be wise.

More discussions about mare
References in classic literature ?
The mare's fidgety," he added, nodding towards the horse-box, before which they were standing, and from which came the sound of restless stamping in the straw.
Jog along, black mare. She was a great housekeeper, but most awful mean.
Scarcely had the yellow man spoken, when he interrupted himself, and though he seemed weary enough before, continued his journey at a pace which would have kept the pedlar's mare on a smart trot.
In the middle was a large rack, with angles answering to every partition of the manger; so that each horse and mare ate their own hay, and their own mash of oats and milk, with much decency and regularity.
Of course, the short cut was the long way round; and it was nearly dark when that unlucky mare and I saw the single street of Yea.
He had soon caught him up again, for Agamemnon's mare Aethe kept pulling stronger and stronger, so that if the course had been longer he would have passed him, and there would not even have been a dead heat.
"In truth," replied he on the mare, "I would not pass you so hastily but for fear that horse might turn restive in the company of my mare."
A shilling of it is in case of accidents--the mare casting a shoe, or the like of that.
"'Blow me," says Tom Smart; and the mare neighed as if she were precisely of the same opinion.
Then they's at least fifty acres I could run my brood mares on, pasture mixed up with trees and steep places and such.
Edmund, who had taken down the mare and presided at the whole, returned with it in excellent time, before either Fanny or the steady old coachman, who always attended her when she rode without her cousins, were ready to set forward.
At Umballa I carried the news of the bay mare's pedigree.' After what he had seen in the garden, he was not going to write of white stallions.