MAP

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Related to mapped: MAPED, mapped out

MAP

 
mean arterial pressure.

MAP

(map),
Abbreviation for morning-after pill.

map

(map),
A representation of a region or structure, for example, of a stretch of DNA.

map

(măp)
n.
Genetics A genetic map.
tr.v. mapped, mapping, maps
Genetics To locate (a gene or DNA sequence) in a specific region of a chromosome in relation to known genes or DNA sequences.

map′pa·ble adj.
map′per n.

MAP

Abbreviation for:
magnesium ammonium phosphate
malignant atrophic papulosis
management action plan (Medspeak-UK)
mandibular angle plane
maturation-activated protein
maximum aerobic power
mean airway pressure
mean arterial pressure
mean aortic pressure
medical advantage plan
Medical Aid for Palestinians
medical aid post (military medicine)
medical assessment process
medical assistance plan
medical assistance program
medical audit programme
medically assisted procreation
Medicare Advocacy Project
Medication Access Program
medication administration record (see there)
medicinal and aromatic plant
megaloblastic anaemia of pregnancy
melphalan, adriamycin, prednisone (oncology)
membrane-associated protein
memory allocation map
mercapturic acid pathway
mesenteric arterial pressure
metaaminophenol
metaaminopyrimethamine
microtubule-associated protein(s)
microwave-assisted process
mitogen-activated protein
modular assembly prosthesis (orthopaedics)
monoclonal antibody production
monophasic action potential (cardiology)
morbidity and performance assessment
mouse antibody production
muscle action potential (neurology)
Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis

MAP

1. Mean airway pressure.
2. Mean arterial pressure.
4. Medical assistance program.
5. Melphalan, adriamycin, prednisone-oncology.
6. Modular assembly prosthesis-orthopedics.
7. Monoclonal antibody production.
8. Monophasic action potential-neurology.
9. Muscle action potential-neurology.

map

(map)
A representation of a region or structure; e.g., of a stretch of DNA.

map

(map)
A representation of a region or structure, e.g., of a stretch of DNA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Usually these vectors are the first M vectors of data array being mapped. Of course a pattern and total mapping error (formula (1)) depend on which M vectors were used for the first stage.
Both Sammon mapping error end sequential one weakly depend on scattering of parameters of vectors being mapped, but mapping errors noticeably change at various configurations of data array.
Three new genetic linkage maps were constructed by adding previously unmapped SSR and INDEL marker loci to the RHA280 x RHA801 map and previously mapped and unmapped SSR marker loci to the HA370 x HA372 and PHA x PHB maps (Fig.
Linkage studies of over 500 individuals from 60 families mapped the gene for XLA to the midportion (Xq22) of the X chromosome, cosegregating with the polymorphic genetic marker DXS 178 (87.88).
The mission of the EGP is to identify genes already mapped by other programs (the organization is continually soliciting candidate genes), and then to resequence the genes in an exhaustive search for the variations that augment resistance or susceptibility to environmental exposures.
"Landforms of the Conterminous United States", USGS, 1991; "A Tapestry of Time and Terrain", USGS, 2000; and "Ecoregions of North America", USDA National Forest Service, 1997) which show the complete 'picture' of the topics mapped in isolation in the North Carolina examples.
Once researchers have mapped and analyzed the trees' spatial and functional relationships, they can quantify their costs and benefits, the third "relationship." Researchers with the Forest Service have developed models that can assess an urban forest's dollar value based on its ability to cool homes and cities without using fossil fuels, to retain soil and water, and to reduce pollutants in the air.
Herbert originally mapped the Uranian auroras onto a rectangle -- a familiar projection with horizontal and vertical axes.
Guided by a two-dimensional map made in the 1960s, Geller and Huchra have mapped more than 11,000 galaxies in a wedge of the northern celestial hemisphere, measuring the redshift of each galaxy brighter than magnitude 20.5 to pinpoint its location in three dimensions.
Such differences are significant, he says, as there are approximately 3 billion bases in the human genome, and each base will have to be mapped at least two or three times to confirm its location.
The genes for 32 proteins similar in cattle, humans and mice have been mapped in all three species.
Last summer, for example, on Farnella's first main leg along the West Coast, researchers discovered dozens of new seamounts and a few new earthquake faults in the 250,000 square miles mapped.