fingerspelling

(redirected from manual alphabet)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

fin·ger·spell·ing

(fing'gĕr-spel'ing)
Method of communication using specific finger and hand movements, representing letters of the alphabet, to spell words.
See also: American Manual Alphabet
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fin·ger·spell·ing

(fing'gĕr-spel'ing)
Method of communication using specific finger and hand movements.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Apparently she memorized, by way of the manual alphabet, the precise language of short stories read to her by a friend in the summer of 1888; she then forgot that she had ever heard of the stories, and quite sincerely believed "The Frost King" to be her own when she published it four years later.
The first mode taught to him was the fingerspelled manual alphabet. As he had no knowledge of the printed alphabet, P.O.P.
had been established, this was then paired with the fingerspelled manual alphabet. This was viewed as a faster and more efficient method and provided him with an introduction to his most likely future primary modes of receptive communication: fingerspelling and sign language.
Expansion into the realm of the manual alphabet and sign language was a slow process for J.H.
Name signs consisted of abbreviations or short forms of people's names, usually utilizing the initial letter (manual alphabet) of that name.
The first section comprises 124 pages of auxiliary material such as a brief history of English; a style manual; a section discussing five Western languages; alphabets for Braille, the American Manual Alphabet, Esperanto, Morse code, and Semaphore; and multiple choice vocabulary inventories (with answers) for grades 3 through 12, and college level.
Other information includes poison control centers for each US state, temperature and pounds conversions, and the manual alphabet for American Sign Language.
He printed the title of the paper in the manual alphabet, carried news articles of particular interest to the deaf community, and often promoted the cause of deaf education and the rights of disabled persons in his editorials.
Knowledge was power, according to Backus, who felt that, in an age of progress and invention, education and information sharing promoted by his newspaper could "raise us to an equality" with the rest of the world (The Manual Alphabet [broadside], 1839).
Chico, the speech therapist, uses signs and the manual alphabet to cue Sheila's speech.
Swett and his Diorama,o an 1859 article in which Swett describes his creation of a miniature of the US Revolutionary War Battle of Lexington, as well as his article Manual Alphabets, a pamphlet published in 1875.