mannerism

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man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm),
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.

man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm)
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.

mannerism

A peculiar modification or exaggeration of style or habit of dress, speech, or action.

Patient discussion about mannerism

Q. In what manner does bipolar reflect?

A. this is very difficult when you are not used to know the symptoms. such persons turn very fast and heavily from euphoric to depressive. the behaviour is then always excessive and sometimes not anymore under control. the risk to go in an asylum is acute.

More discussions about mannerism
References in periodicals archive ?
This de-centering of the world by the ellipse will find expression in the symbolic imaginary of Mannerist and early Baroque art.
(1) Born in 1564, Galileo was a man of his time who looked back on the anti-classical, Mannerist rejection of High Renaissance art as an aberration (Panofsky 8-10; Edgerton 225).
Those two towering figures, the former in his later years already a 'mannerist' of sorts, hover throughout the exhibition as spirits to whom artistic libations have been offered by Pontormo and Rosso.
(10) Figures by the Classical red-figure Mannerists reminded Beazley of the Antwerp Mannerists, Dutch painters of the early 16th century whose slender figures and pleated garments were barely distinguishable from those of their immediate predecessors.
If composers such as Cardoso, Magalhaes or Lobo (not to mention their illustrious teacher Mendes) are to be considered 'mannerists' in any way at all, it must clearly be in the positive sense of the interpretations cited above by Honour and Fleming.
Juxtaposing some of Solt's assertions on statement-making with Martin's commentary on the Mannerists, one is led to the conclusion that Parmigianino indeed makes statements (as Escher no doubt does) - it's merely that they are difficult to classify according to type.
Then one leaves Parma, makes a kind of detour through Ferrara where a certain mode of Mannerism was practiced by Dosso Dossi, traverses a gallery given over to Mannerists of varying degrees of achievement, but where, on a distant wall framed by two doors, one sees the magnificent and epochal Crucifixion With the Virgin and Saints of 1583, an early masterpiece by the Bolognese genius Annibale Carracci.
Art historically speaking, his works are mannerist reprises of the abstract devices of spontaneity and transcendence; expressive gesture and Minimalist geometry remain precariously alive, even as they have been ingeniously assimilated.
I don't have the sensitivity, the education, or the philosophy of the Italian Mannerists, but I'm a Mannerist in the sense that I deform things.
It is essentially a Florentine story, running from Cennini and Alberti, through Leonardo to the Mannerists, which has shaped the author's approach.
In her lucid study of Athena, Petra Tournay has traced "the pursuit of mannerist traditions" in the novel, considering Banville's use of myth as "one of the dominant mannerist and postmodern themes" (1-2).
I date my love for Dutch Mannerist painting from that unexpected encounter with strangeness, and though to my knowledge only two museums in this country possess a work by this curious master, it is for the Wtewael that I resolutely head whenever I visit them, whatever their other glories.