mannerism

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man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm),
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm)
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mannerism

A peculiar modification or exaggeration of style or habit of dress, speech, or action.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Patient discussion about mannerism

Q. In what manner does bipolar reflect?

A. this is very difficult when you are not used to know the symptoms. such persons turn very fast and heavily from euphoric to depressive. the behaviour is then always excessive and sometimes not anymore under control. the risk to go in an asylum is acute.

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References in periodicals archive ?
But in other terms the film pursued--perhaps to a manneristic extent--means Black Audio had used often in the past: a suspicion of documentary evidence, a reliance on poetic recollection, and a sidelong approach to moral narratives.
The acting that helped to promote specifically Manneristic ambiguity in Williams's early major plays occurred in male-female pairs: Marlon Brando and Jessica Tandy (Vivien Leigh as Blanche DuBois in the film) from A Streetcar Named Desire, Eli Wallach and Maureen Stapleton in The Rose Tattoo, and Geraldine Page and Paul Newman in Sweet Bird of Youth.
Daverio's frequent and unnecessary substitution of foreign terms--even well-known ones (in toto, in nuce, etc.)--for perfectly understandable English ones is disturbingly manneristic.
Some traditional scholars of the German baroque will bridle at the heavy doses of literary theory, but will find a reward in Newman's non-condescending attitude to texts often disqualified as minor and manneristic; by taking them and their project seriously, she is able to evaluate them on their own terms and to demonstrate how and why their nature is fundamentally different from the Renaissance and Enlightenment texts that too often provide the standards for their evaluation.
This partisanship, it seems,justifies manneristic extremes which will weary some readers.
Similarly, children I may present with unusual manneristic behaviour, obsessions, and a one-sided response to both their peers and to adults, whereby they may talk without listening.
Hofmann's style is characterized as " late baroque " or " manneristic, " because of the self - conscious richness, sometimes highly overloaded, of his imagery and language.
Their work was typically a curiously manneristic amalgam of organicism, geometry, and Op illusion--a sort of abstract uncanny.
This technique of switching from limited perspective to limited perspective is, of course, not manneristic embellishment, but the core of Stifter's works, conveying a vision in which the world exists only as interpretations and perspectives; as the grandfather in 'Granit' warns: 'Es ist kein sicherer Halt moglich' (2,2: 41).
In his concluding chapter Vitercik briefly takes up the problem of Mendelssohn's works after the early 1830s, works that have seemed to lack the imagination of the earlier music and to fall into manneristic classicism.