mannerism

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man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm),
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.

man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm)
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.

mannerism

A peculiar modification or exaggeration of style or habit of dress, speech, or action.

Patient discussion about mannerism

Q. In what manner does bipolar reflect?

A. this is very difficult when you are not used to know the symptoms. such persons turn very fast and heavily from euphoric to depressive. the behaviour is then always excessive and sometimes not anymore under control. the risk to go in an asylum is acute.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Appropriately, above bronzes by Tetrode and Severo da Ravenna in the study hangs part of Hack's collection of northern mannerist paintings (Fig.
Thus, the zoom in Hong is primarily an experimented technique and, I would argue, a mannerist approach to mise-en-scene.
It appears that Stirling has taken to heart certain effects in Mannerist architecture, where rules are followed in one part only to be broken in another.
For these types of patrons Mannerist print makers frequently chose to depict subjects of many kinds in series such as the four seasons, the temperaments, or the hours of the day.
Movie critics today are obsessed with sniffing out the political implications of the latest releases, such as the suspicion that the sex comedy "Knocked Up" was insufficiently pro-abortion or that the Xbox mannerist Spartans of "300" were ancient Republicans.
Chronologically, historians place Arcimboldo in the Mannerist period, falling between the end of the High Renaissance and the beginning of the Baroque, yet his allegorical paintings really aren't Mannerist at all.
His decorative choices, some of which reflect Late Archaic styles, have led to his being classified as a Mannerist.
Robert Mapplethorpe and the Classical Tradition: Photographs and Mannerist Prints
I have become a passionate convert to the concept of video installations as art since seeing Bill Viola's hypnotic 1995 masterpiece, The Greeting, at Forth Worth Museum of Modern Art two years ago - described by the museum (I can do no better than to quote) as a "psychologically gripping performance inspired by the Florentine Mannerist Pontormo's painting The Visitation, 1528-29" - and went in April to see some more of his work newly purchased by the Walker Gallery, most notably a piece called Observance.
While the occasionally mannerist soundtrack threatens to drown all the quiet desperation with denotative musical distress signals, promising writer/director Sean Frewer wisely never permits it to linger too long.
THE EXHIBITION "Robert Mapplethorpe and the Classical Tradition: Photographs and Mannerist Prints" explores the relationship between the photographer and classical art, in particular, 16th-century Flemish Mannerist engravings.
Despite the acclaim popular crime and mystery writing has achieved for its revelations of dark motives concealed beneath the veneer of normalcy and the journeys it offers down mean streets and into questionable neighborhoods, this body of work constitutes a mannerist rather than a realist genre.