mannerism

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man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm),
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.

man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm)
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.

mannerism

A peculiar modification or exaggeration of style or habit of dress, speech, or action.

Patient discussion about mannerism

Q. In what manner does bipolar reflect?

A. this is very difficult when you are not used to know the symptoms. such persons turn very fast and heavily from euphoric to depressive. the behaviour is then always excessive and sometimes not anymore under control. the risk to go in an asylum is acute.

More discussions about mannerism
References in periodicals archive ?
And without any doubt, Sultani truly epitomised Lucknow's famed mannerisms.
There is also a frequent habit in raising the intonation on the last word of every sentence and, now that this mannerism has been given a name - 'uptalk' - it will probably spread like wildfire.
Louie's appearance and mannerisms are strongly evocative of Sivero Louie's appearance and mannerisms are strongly evocative of Sivero LAWSUIT
mannerisms of the Redman) but was also in love with his assistant, Mary Kay (Helen McCrory).
Successful politicians have always adopted exaggerated mannerisms.
It could be seen in their eyes, understood in their words and interpreted from their mannerisms.
New boy James Simmonds, signed from Chelsea, looks like striker Chopra, has the same running style and mannerisms during a match.
To insist that the mannerisms of a 12-year-old be explicitly identified as gay or straight is ridiculous.
The newly revised and updated second edition of Body Idioms And More: For Learners Of English by Mary Pare is an informative guide through the many intricacies involved in explanation of the phrases, terms, idioms, synonyms, and expressions expressed through the use of body parts, functions, and mannerisms.
Sometimes, a BFF's facial expressions or mannerisms speak louder than words.
But it also reminds me not to rely on lazy prejudices: Los Angeles is no longer just charming ticky-tacky but becoming now a serious city; serious architects whose mannerisms are not yours can, on form, remind you why others bother with them; and all those chirpy transport officials, overtly surprised and pleased to be in a quality building, are merely getting a little bit of the payoff that architecture was supposed to be about: namely, delight.
Do they start to copy their mannerisms and accents the longer they live together?