mannerism


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man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm),
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.

man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm)
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.

mannerism

A peculiar modification or exaggeration of style or habit of dress, speech, or action.

Patient discussion about mannerism

Q. In what manner does bipolar reflect?

A. this is very difficult when you are not used to know the symptoms. such persons turn very fast and heavily from euphoric to depressive. the behaviour is then always excessive and sometimes not anymore under control. the risk to go in an asylum is acute.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Challenging the negative connotations of Mannerism is one of the stated aims of the exhibition, which tackles the task by comparing the development of two Tuscan artists, Rosso Fiorentino and Pontormo, both born in 1494.
Anushka describes as to how PK's " headlight jaisi aankhen " and " flying saucer jaise kaan ," made him distinct, much like Gump's character who had a slow mannerism and simple perception about life.
Reviews and critiques of the Broadway productions (together with the first films of Streetcar and Sweet Bird) offer suitable information to establish the specific dimensions of Mannerism and its association with ambiguity.
Here the modernist repatriations of Mannerism ring true: Goltzius's was an art about art.
There have been times (and particular pictures) in the past when it seemed that Jeff Wall was determined to take the technical image from classicism to mannerism in one digital swoop.
Categorization according to style, or the familiar, reliable concepts of High Renaissance and Mannerism, we are told at the outset, have no place in this tome.
These three volumes reveal how little Rowe's main themes have changed: his love of Italy and the dandified artifices of sixteenth-century Mannerism, and his contempt for what he sees as Modernism's delusive and destructive vices: 'physics envy, Zeitgeist worship, object fixation and stradaphobia'.
This book accounts for one of the intractable features of Dante's style, his seemingly gratuitous astronomical imagery -- a mannerism parodied by Chaucer: "th'orisonte hath reft the sonne his lyght, -- This is as muche to seye, as it was nyght" (Franklin's Tale, 1017-18).
In between lies a kaleidoscope of classic movement, dance mannerism, emotion, and fleeting suggestions of relationships.
2) Another young man, James Stirling was examining Corbusier's most recent buildings, the Maisons Jaoul (p74) and Ronchamp (p75) and cautiously coming to the conclusion that Mannerism and roughness were really all right.
After studying in Moscow and successfully performing in Kiev, Toronto, and Copenhagen, he gained renown by creating Charms of Mannerism and Dreams of Japan for Nina Ananiashvili and her friends.
A poetic mannerism is evident in the naming of components.