mannequin


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mannequin

(man'i-kin) [Fr. fr. D. manneken, little man] See: manikin

man·ne·quin

, mannikin (man'i-kin)
A model, especially one with removable pieces, of the human body or any of its parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incidentally, it was a lady corporator of BMC, Ritu Tawde, who undertook this crusade against display of shapely mannequins to display women's wear including lingerie.
Models came from London and later during the month the lady mannequins used to parade through the store in designer clothes.
LEG IT: Ann Hewson outside the shop with the remains of the mannequin, inset in close-up, on the wall.
Black mannequins don't sell," said Marc Lacroix, a manager at one of the world's leading producers, Cofrad in Paris, which also owns Los Angeles firm Patina-V, a maker of ethnically diverse fashion mannequins.
It only works, the chief said, because police back up the location of the mannequin within the next day or two with a real officer.
Because the mannequin will be tested and calibrated in the test chamber "as is" and be later used for OT measurements "as is" there is no need to apply similarity rules for compensating for clothing, dummy size and others, except the difference between the standard test conditions and the actual indoor and geographic conditions like indoor air velocity, barometric pressure, indoor air pressure, and the actual size of the indoor space, all of which may be compensated for by the algorithm given in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 133.
The budding controversy is over the shops' storefront mannequins, more bosomy and large-nippled than those found in most department stores.
THIS cream wire mannequin from Breeze is another good buy at pounds 15.
Azza Fahmy pieces have somewhat of a rarified collector's appeal to them, and today, as the new collection offers new interpretations to old favorites, the vintage Azza Fahmy brooches on the mannequin will also be for sale soon.
Hanging that mannequin would, quite obviously to a reasonable person, constitute and create a danger.
Petkova and Ehrsson first confirmed, using questionnaires, that 16 male and 16 female volunteers experienced an illusory body-swap with a mannequin.
Cathy Wilkes, who lives in Glasgow, has created an installation featuring the mannequin on the loo.