manic-depressive

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manic-depressive

 
marked by alternating periods of mania and depression.
m.-d. disorders former name for the bipolar disorders.

man·ic-de·pres·sive

(man'ik dē-pres'iv),
1. Pertaining to a manic-depressive psychosis (bipolar disorder).
2. One suffering from such a disorder.

manic-depressive

/man·ic-de·pres·sive/ (man″ik-de-pres´iv) alternating between attacks of mania and depression, as in bipolar disorders.

manic-depressive

(măn′ĭk-dĭ-prĕs′ĭv)
adj.
Of, relating to, or having bipolar disorder.
n.
A person who has bipolar disorder.

man·ic-de·pres·sive

(man'ik dĕ-pres'siv)
Pertaining to a manic-depressive psychosis (bipolar disorder, qv).
See also: mania, bipolar disorder

bi·po·lar dis·or·der

(bī-pō'lăr dis-ōr'dĕr)
Affective disorder characterized by occurrence of alternating manic, hypomanic, or mixed episodes and with major depresive episodes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jamison: Certainly, children can get manic-depressive illness, and sometimes some of the symptoms of hyperactivity can look like mania and the other way around.
That's certainly true, and there are certain kinds of manic-depressive illness where you have generally more euphoria in your manias and certain other patterns within the illness itself in which you're more likely to respond to lithium.
Jamison: There is nothing like that demonstrated for manic-depressive illness.
If you had a manic-depressive patient who wanted to go public and really help the cause, how would you counsel that patient?
George & Neufeld, 1987) and on Manic-Experience and Manic-Depressiveness the manic-depressives scored highest.
Though, as in the previous analyses-by-item, group differences were not significant in claims to have experienced precognition or contemporaneous ESP, 37% of schizophrenics reported seeing the dead, as opposed to about 19% of students and manic-depressives ([[chi].
Of the schizophrenics, 43% claimed to have had this experience, with manic-depressives being close behind at 39%, whereas only 24% of the students had ever felt so convinced ([[Chi].
It may be, perhaps, of anecdotal interest that of all the 365 subjects in this experiment, just two of them responded to the Comments section at the end of the questionnaire by writing a poem, and that both of them were manic-depressives with Creative Personality scores at or above their group mean.