manganese poisoning


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manganese

 (Mn) [mang´gah-nēs]
a chemical element, atomic number 25, atomic weight 54.938. (See Appendix 6.) Its salts occur in the body tissue in very small amounts and serve as activators of liver arginase and other enzymes.
manganese poisoning a condition usually caused by inhalation of manganese dust; symptoms of chronic exposure include mental disorders accompanying a syndrome resembling Parkinson's disease, and inflammation throughout the respiratory system.

manganese poisoning

Acute or chronic intoxication due to manganese excess.
 
Aetiology
Industrial exposure to manganese-laden fumes and dusts in mining, steel foundries, welding, and battery manufacture.
 
Clinical findings
Acute—pneumonitis; chronic—psychotic or schizophrenia-like episodes, parkinsonism, movement disorders.
 
Management
O2 administration, supportive care.

manganese poisoning

Acute or chronic intoxication due to manganese excess Etiology Industrial exposure to manganese-laden fumes and dusts in mining, steel foundries, welding, battery manufacture Clinical Acute–pneumonitis; chronic–psychotic or schizophrenia-like episodes, parkinsonism, movement disorders Management O2 administration, supportive. See Manganese.

manganese poisoning

An industrial disease largely confined to miners who breathe manganese ore dust and workers exposed to manganese compounds. Brain damage occurs, resulting in rigidity of the muscles with loss of facial expression, slowness of movement, speech impairment, and delusions, hallucinations and compulsive disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Manganese poisoning involves permanent neurological disorder called manganism, with symptoms of tremors, difficulty in walking, facial muscle spasms, irritability, aggressiveness, and hallucinations.
The authors concluded that progressive increases in the manganese concentration in drinking-water are associated with progressively higher prevalences of neurological signs of chronic manganese poisoning. In an epidemiological study in Japan, adverse effects were seen in humans consuming manganese dissolved in drinking-water, probably at a concentration close to 28 mg/litre [28,000 [micro]g/L is 70 times greater than the 400 [micro]g/L guideline].
Together with dopamine, manganese can accelerate oxidation-reduction reactions, producing reactive oxidative molecules such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide free radicals; this potentially explains the dopaminergic neurotoxicity seen in chronic manganese poisoning and the relief of symptoms by the administration of L-dopa in some patients (10-14).