maneuver

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maneuver

 [mah-noo´ver]
any dexterous procedure; see also method, operation, procedure, surgery, and technique. For names of specific maneuvers, see under the name.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ma·neu·ver

(mă-nū'vĕr),
A planned movement or procedure.
[Fr. manoeuvre, fr. L. manu operari, to work by hand]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

manoeuvre

Medspeak
noun Any form of management or procedure that acts on a patient to evoke a result or outcome.

Vox populi
noun A procedure or series of movements that require skill.
verb To perform a series of movements with caution and skill.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

maneuver

Medtalk A method or technique for performing a task. See Abdominal thrust maneuver, Doll's head maneuver, Epley maneuver, Flake maneuver, Hallpike maneuver, Head-tilt/chin-lift maneuver, Heimlich maneuver, Jaw thrust maneuver, Jendrassik maneuver, Lichtenstein maneuver, Semont maneuver, Triple airway maneuver, Valsalva maneuver.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ma·neu·ver

(mă-nū'vĕr)
A planned movement or procedure.
Synonym(s): manoeuvre.
[Fr. manoeuvre, fr. L. manu operari, to work by hand]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ma·neu·ver

(mă-nū'vĕr)
A planned movement or procedure.
Synonym(s): manoeuvre.
[Fr. manoeuvre, fr. L. manu operari, to work by hand]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
203) It is difficult to see how academics who are unable to recognize the need to dirty their hands with the impurity of political maneuvering (or who are unwilling to admit that they regularly participate in such maneuvering) are up to the task of preparing technical communication practitioners who will need to become effective political maneuverers within their organizations.
"Business people," continued my father, looking as if he were thinking this thought for the first time, "we're just maneuverers. We move things around, that's all.
Whyte (1994) talks about "corporate drive-by shooters" which are the maneuverers that can kill young spirits and ambush and finish one's life at work.