mandibular movement


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man·dib·u·lar move·ment

1. movements of the lower jaw;
2. all changes in position of which the mandible is capable.

man·dib·u·lar move·ment

(man-dibyū-lăr mūvmĕnt)
Motion or changes in position of which lower jaw is capable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hqdzelek, "Evaluation of Mandibular Movement Functions Using Instrumental Ultrasound System," Journal of Prosthodontics, vol.
The patient is able to achieve the maximum intercuspal position when the teeth of both the arches are effectively guided and reprogrammed the mandibular movement. In most patients, reestablishment of reasonable masticatory efficiency is dependent upon good tongue mobility.
* Each subject was interviewed using modified Fosenca's questionnaire.7 Patients were evaluated concerning facial pain, TMJ tenderness, joint sounds, limitations in mandibular movement, locking, stiffness or tenderness of jaw muscles and difficulty in chewing.
Mandibular position and mandibular movements. Brit D J.
A model of mandibular movements during speech: normative pilot study for the Brazilian Portuguese Llnguage.
Most of patients 63.4% showed signs of alteration in the mouth opening pattern 39.1% presented joint sounds on opening or closing the mouth and 20.4% on mandibular movement. These findings are also consistent with the current study.
Semiadjustable articulator is capable of closely reproducing mandibular movement and therefore reducing intraoral adjustments.
No history of TMJ dysfunction or myofascial pain syndrome, crepitus facial muscle pain, or limitation of mandibular movement
Jaw opening capacity is often regarded as one of the important parameters for evaluating the function of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and masticatory muscle status.2 The range of mandibular movement is a valuable measure in the examination of patients with suspected functional disorders of the masticatory appa- ratus.3
Smooth, harmonious and synchronized mandibular movements are important for effective and predictable-masticatory efficiency after restorative procedures.
At nine months follow-up, the patient showed satisfactory dental occlusion and mandibular movements with no vascular or cranial abnormalities.
The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of the rabbit presents morphological similarities to the human TMJ, and there are also similarities in mandibular movements during mastication (Alves et al., 2016).