mandible


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mandible

 [man´dĭ-b'l]
the horseshoe-shaped bone forming the lower jaw. adj., adj mandib´ular. It consists of a central portion, which forms the chin and supports the lower teeth, and two perpendicular portions, or rami, which point upward from the back of the chin on either side and articulate with the temporal bones.

man·di·ble

(man'di-bŭl), [TA]
A U-shaped bone (in superior view), forming the lower jaw, articulating by its upturned extremities with the temporal bone on either side.

mandible

(măn′də-bəl)
n.
1. The lower jaw of a vertebrate animal.
2. Either the upper or lower part of the beak in birds.
3. Any of various mouth organs of invertebrates used for seizing and biting food, especially either of a pair of such organs in insects and other arthropods.

man·dib′u·lar (-dĭb′yə-lər) adj.

mandible

The lower jaw bone. The joint where the mandible meets the upper jaw at the temporal bone is called the temporomandibular joint.

man·di·ble

(man'di-bĕl) [TA]
A U-shaped bone, forming the lower jaw, articulating by its upturned extremities with the temporal bone on either side.
Synonym(s): jaw bone, mandibula, submaxilla.
Enlarge picture
LEFT LATERAL VIEW OF MANDIBLE

mandible

(man′dĭ-bĕl) [L. mandibula, lower jawbone]
The horseshoe-shaped bone forming the lower jaw.
See: illustrationmandibular (-dib′yŭ-lăr), adjective

mandible

The lower jaw bone. The head of the mandible, on either side, articulates with a hollow on the underside of the temporal bone, just in front of the ear. This is called the temporo-mandibular joint. The mandible is pulled upwards by powerful masticatory muscles. In dislocation of the mandible, the heads slip forward out of the hollows in the temporal bone and the mouth remains wide open until the dislocation is reduced by downward pressure on the back teeth.

mandible

that part of the mouthparts of an animal which does most of the crushing of food materials. In vertebrates, the term usually denotes the lower jaw. In insects and other arthropods, the mandibles are one of a pair of mouthparts used for crushing food (see Fig. 197 ).

Mandible

The medical term for the lower jaw. One type of oral appliance used to treat OSA pushes the mandible forward in order to ease breathing during sleep.

man·di·ble

(man'di-bĕl) [TA]
U-shaped bone (in superior view), forming lower jaw, articulating by its upturned extremities with temporal bone on either side.
Synonym(s): jaw bone, lower jaw, mandibulum, submaxilla.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conventional radiographs and computerized tomographic scan showed diffuse increase of the lesion of mandible, with loss of normal trabecular pattern leading to classical ground glass pattern (Fig.2).
melanogastor is clearly separated from all other species on cranium and mandible using by principal component analysis.
Small number of infections show that not only biochemical but also some other contributing factors are responsible for postoperative complications such as infection of mandible angle fracture after rigid internal fixation.
Perhaps, she may have had subclinical pulmonary blastomycosis which disseminated to an already damaged mandible. Another theory is reactivation of the blastomycosis.
MRI and CT scans showed a mass originating from the symphysis of the mandible extending up to the level of angle of mandible on the right side and to the left canine tooth on the left side (Figure 6, 7).
(1,3) Mandible is the most common site for intraosseous salivary gland neoplasm, accounting for 75% of all cases.
However, in fourth-month control appointment, the presence of tissue adjacent to the erupting teeth was observed radiographically, as well as an asymmetry in the left mandible, so a second intervention was decided (Figure 3(c)).
Orthopantomogram showed sclerotic change at the right body of the mandible with periosteal reaction (Figure 1).
A ventrodorsal (intraoral) radiograph (Figure 1C) of the rostral mandible showed a well-defined osseous mass with intense radiopaque areas and different degrees of ossification, visualized as dispersed radiolucent points inside the mass.
Open fractures of horizontal rami of both mandibles were visible in oral cavity without any wound on ventral aspect.
Second, the complex anatomy of the mandible, such as the numerous trabeculae, the double-layered cortex, and the teeth roots, may interfere with the radioopaque shadowing of the image for the visualization and identification of the foramina.[sup][5] In our unpublished data, the interalveolar foramina, as well as the bony canals originating from the foramina into the bony structures of the mandible, were observable using cone-beam computerized tomography.