man-of-war


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man-of-war

(măn′ə-wôr′)
n. pl. men-of-war
References in periodicals archive ?
Loggerhead turtles and some fish species are among the creatures that eat the Portuguese man-of-war, completing that section of the food chain.
Portuguese Man-of-War are only occasionally reported in UK waters with the last significant UK strandings in 2009 and 2012.
A spokesman for the Marine Conservation Society said any sightings in Wales should be reported on its website Dr Peter Richardson, of the MCS, said: "No-one has been killed by Portuguese man-of-war stings in the UK so far - but they have elsewhere in the world.
Another Nyad Twitter post read: "The medical team said I should not go another two nights in the water and risk additional likely Man-of-War stings which could have a long term cumulative effect on my body."
The latest Portuguese man-of-war was found on the same beach where the first was found on Monday.
'They are not dangerous, but there have been isolated reports of Portuguese Man-Of-War jellyfish.
"In many places, the proteins give the impression of a man-of-war jellyfish," he says.
There's the blue-ringed octopus, the piranha, the black torpedo ray and the Portuguese man-of-war.
Subtitled The World in a Man-of-War, the novel depicts life aboard a typical frigate, the Neversink, and describes the tyrannies to which ship's officers subject ordinary seamen and the appalling conditions under which the seamen live.
Artist Stephen Biesty takes readers on a fascinating tour of this 100-gun man-of-war as it sails into battle on the high seas.