mammographic abnormality

mammographic abnormality

A lesion of the breast or breast tissue identified by mammography.

mammographic abnormality

A lesion of the breast or breast tissue identified by mammography, see there.
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(1) Additionally, initial planning and triangulation of the mammographic abnormality, particularly in regards to accurate depth measurements, of a 3D finding on the traditional 2D FFDM may be time consuming and allows room for error.
Evaluation of a palpable lump or mammographic abnormality.
reported mammographically detected abnormality in 78% of cases [17], but another study [18] reported that 69% of patients with PASH presented no mammographic abnormality. However, that series included cases in which PASH was incidentally noted histologically.
Most commonly observed mammographic abnormality was circumscribed high density spiculated mass with axillary lymphadenopathy in 23 (40.4%) patients followed by speculated mass alone in 15 (26.3%) patients, multicentric masses with axillary lymphadenopathy in 12 (21.1%) patients and speculated mass with microcalcification in 7 (12.3%) patients.
The ultrasonographer now knows to scan specifically in the lower, outer, right breast approximately the same distance from the nipple to try to find a sonographic correlate to the mammographic abnormality. The correlate should also match in size and shape.
In two patients referred for MRI because of an abnormal mammogram, the original mammographic abnormality was benign; however, MRI demonstrated in each case an unsuspected malignancy in the contralateral breast.
She reported on 4,460 women aged 18-49 years in the Mayo Benign Breast Disease Cohort who underwent excisional breast biopsy for a palpable or mammographic abnormality that proved to be benign breast disease.
Many sonographers are not mammographers, and they have a difficult time determining the location of a specific mammographic abnormality and correlating mammographic findings with sonographic findings.
The diagnostic ultrasound exam (Figures 9,10) demonstrates an irregularly-shaped, hypoechoic, non-circumscribed mass with angulated margins, an echogenic halo, and posterior shadowing located 3 cm from the nipple at the 9:00 axis, which corresponds to the mammographic abnormality.
Since most DCIS lesions encountered today present as a nonpalpable, grossly unapparent mammographic abnormality, accurate determination of the size or extent of the lesion is often problematic clinically.
At that point, breast ultrasound could be used to determine if a mammographic abnormality or clinically palpable mass was cystic or solid.
Breast MRI may be helpful in certain situations in which there is an equivocal mammographic abnormality and for 3-dimensional localization of a lesion seen on one view only.