mammal


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mammal

 [mam´al]
an individual of the Mammalia, a division of vertebrates, including all that possess hair and suckle their young. adj., adj mammal´ian.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mam·mal

(mam'ăl),
An animal of the class Mammalia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mammal

(măm′əl)
n.
Any of various warm-blooded vertebrate animals of the class Mammalia, including humans, characterized by a covering of hair on the skin and, in the female, milk-producing mammary glands for nourishing the young.

mam·ma′li·an (mă-mā′lē-ən) adj. & n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mammal

any animal of the class Mammalia, a group of about 4250 species, often regarded as the most highly evolved animals, and so named because they all possess MAMMARY GLANDS. There are three living subclasses:
  1. Monotremata - MONOTREMES, primitive egg-laying mammals such as the duck-billed platypus and Echidna, the spiny ant eater.
  2. Marsupialia - MARSUPIALS, which transfer their young to pouches for the latter part of their early development.
  3. Eutheria - EUTHERIANS, which have a placenta.

Mammals are characterized by the presence of hair, a DIAPHRAGM used in AERIAL RESPIRATION, milk secretion in the female (LACTATION) for suckling the young, presence of only the left systemic arch in the blood circulatory system, three auditory ossicles in the ear, and a lower jaw of a single pair of bones. In all classes except the monotremes, the young are born live (see VIVIPAROUS).

Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The new sign will remind road users to keep an eye out for small wild mammals, in order to lessen the number of collisions involving animals each year.
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David concludes: "Taking part in Mammals on Roads can really make a huge difference and helps ongoing conservation efforts by building a countrywide picture of how mammal numbers are changing.
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The study, published in the journal Science, showed that ancient humans might have begun hunting large mammal species down to size -- by way of extinction -- at least 90,000 years earlier than previously thought.
Mammals started being active in the daytime after non-avian (non-bird-like) dinosaurs were wiped out, explained the lead author and TAU doctoral student Roi Maor.
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The data gathered by the participants will address the need for more comprehensive information about mammal populations in the Durham Wildlife Trust area and involve local communities in discovering and understanding the wildlife which lives alongside them.