malpresentation


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Related to malpresentation: brow presentation, oblique lie, fetal presentation

malpresentation

 [mal″prez-en-ta´shun]
faulty fetal presentation.

mal·pre·sen·ta·tion

(mal'prē-sen-tā'shŭn),
Faulty presentation of the fetus; presentation of any part other than the occiput.

malpresentation

/mal·pres·en·ta·tion/ (mal″prez-en-ta´shun) faulty fetal presentation.

malpresentation

[malpres′əntā′shən]
Etymology: L, malus, bad, praesentare, to show
an abnormal position of the fetus in the birth canal.

mal·pre·sen·ta·tion

(mal'prez-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
Faulty position of the fetus; presentation of any part other than the occiput.

malpresentation

Any position (lie) of the fetus before or during labour that would result in a part other than the vertex of the head appearing first at birth. Malpresentations include breech, face (head extended), shoulder and arm presentations.

malpresentation

faulty fetal presentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study breech was the most common malpresentation, 334 (41.
6%) and they were more likely to have problems like antepartum haemorrhage (APH) preterm or prolonged labour morbidly adherent placenta and the risk of malpresentation or an ectopic eventuality in their next pregnancy.
It usually presents with acute abdominal pain and hypovolaemic shock during labour, especially in the parturient with a scarred uterus owing to previous caesarean section or with malpresentation or second-stage dystocia (1,2).
Plagiocephaly may occur during pregnancy due to malpresentation of the fetus (10 or multiple births, (6) or after birth due to positional or environmental factors.
He also discusses normal labor and delivery (including pain management) and such complications as prolonged labor, shoulder dystocia, malpresentation, maternal fever, postpartum hemorrhage, and perineal laceration and episiotomy.
A recent study examined baby position changes throughout labor and whether the use of an epidural leads to more malpresentation at birth.
There were also lower rates of fetal intolerance, cephalopelvic disproportion, and malpresentation in the highly exposed cohort.
These include fetal malpresentation, uterine anomalies, adnexal tumors, uterine leiomyomata, or pelvic adhesions.
Criteria mandating transfer included prior cesarean, malpresentation, multiple gestation, intrauterine growth restriction, severe preeclampsia, placenta previa, significant vaginal bleeding, major fetal anomalies, anticipated preterm delivery (< 36 weeks), nonreassuring fetal heart tones (NRFHTs), and need for labor induction or augmentation with oxytocin.
Elective C-Section: No Emergency C-Section: Yes *** Rules learned If No previous vaginal delivery, and Abnormal 2nd Trimester Ultrasound, and Malpresentation at admission Then Probability of Emergency C-Section is 0.
At least half the infants were delivered by cesarean when eclampsia (52%), abruptio placenta (57%), fetal distress (63%), dysfunctional labor (64%), cord prolapse (68%), placenta previa (82%), malpresentation (84%), or cephalopelvic disproportion (98%) were diagnosed (1).