malpractice


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to malpractice: Legal malpractice

malpractice

 [mal″prak´tis]
any professional misconduct, unreasonable lack of skill or fidelity in professional duties, or illegal or immoral conduct. Malpractice is one form of negligence, which in legal terms can be defined as the omission to do something that a reasonable person, guided by those ordinary considerations which ordinarily regulate human affairs, would do, or the doing of something that a reasonable and prudent person would not do. In medical practice, nursing practice, and allied health professions malpractice means bad, wrong, or injudicious treatment of a patient professionally; it results in injury, unnecessary suffering, or death to the patient. The court may hold that malpractice has occurred even though the practitioner acted in good faith. Malpractice and negligence may occur through omission of a necessary act as well as commission of an unwise or negligent act.

mal·prac·tice

(mal-prak'tis), Avoid the mispronunciation mal'practice.
Mistreatment of a patient through ignorance, carelessness, neglect, or criminal intent.

malpractice

(măl-prăk′tĭs)
n.
1. Performance, as by a physician or lawyer, that falls below the professional minimum standard of care or service for a patient or client, especially when legally actionable because an injury or loss has been suffered by the patient or client.
2. An instance of such performance.

mal′prac·ti′tion·er (-tĭsh′ə-nər) n.

malpractice

Failure—or alleged failure—to provide professional services with the skill usually exhibited by responsible and careful members of a profession, resulting in injury, loss or damage to the party contracting those services; misconduct or unreasonable lack of skill in the performance of an act by a professional.

malpractice

Modern medicine Failure to provide professional services with the skill usually exhibited by responsible and careful members of a profession, resulting in injury, loss, or damage to the party contracting those services; misconduct or unreasonable lack of skill in the performance of an act by a professional. See Chiropractic malpractice, Medical malpractice.

mal·prac·tice

(mal-prak'tis)
Mistreatment of a patient through ignorance, carelessness, neglect, or criminal intent.

malpractice

Professional misconduct including professional negligence. Medical malpractice includes the failure to provide proper standards of medical care, engaging recklessly in dangerous treatments, abusing professional privileges in any way, giving fraudulent certificates, procuring illegal abortions, using medical status to exert improper influence such as establishing sexual relationships with patients, betraying professional confidences, engaging in improper self-promotion and disparaging colleagues. Doctors behaving in any of these ways may be brought before the Professional Conduct Committee of the General Medical Council and, the allegations being proved, may have their names erased from the Medical Register so that they may no longer legally practise. Some forms of malpractice are also criminal offences for which a doctor may also have to answer in law.

mal·prac·tice

(mal-prak'tis)
Mistreatment of a patient through ignorance, carelessness, neglect, or criminal intent.
References in periodicals archive ?
If such testimony would not result in a jury verdict in favor of a medical malpractice plaintiff, it is hard to imagine what would).
However, empirical research regarding jury verdicts in medical malpractice cases shows "that juries treat physicians very fairly, perhaps with too much deference" based on the actual level and degree of medical negligence.
Meanwhile, WAEC's Head of National Office (HNO), Mr Olu Adenipekun, told NAN in an interview that the council would continue to deploy cutting edge technology in fighting examination malpractice.
Adenipeku told NAN that WAEC would stop at nothing to protect the integrity of its examinations as well as ensure that all persons involved in any form of malpractice would be arrested and prosecuted.
Accordingly, cost estimates vary wildly, stoking the medical malpractice liability debate (Wright and Baicker 2012).
But these studies suffer from likely survey response bias because those most concerned about medical malpractice liability are most likely to respond to such surveys.
(23) The standard provides the padent two years after the alleged malpractice to file a claim, rather than allowing them to file two years after the discovery of the malpractice or resulting injury.
The authors noted that if higher spending is motivated by concerns about malpractice, then the spending would be considered "defensively motivated.
Malpractice risk raises medical costs in the aggregate, above and beyond its direct consequences (diminishing malpractice spending is more likely to damage than enhance social wellbeing).
In some ways physician malpractice insurance is much like car insurance in that the longer a physician goes without a claim the lower his premiums are likely to be.
Attorneys of all levels of experience, and especially the growing number of young attorneys who are hanging their own shingles, will find that Florida Legal Malpractice and Attorney Ethics, serves as an invaluable resource--a proverbial hotline that should be located on every attorney's desk to be consulted for general guidance or whenever a question or gut feeling arises about whether conduct may cross the line into problematic ethical or malpractice territory.
Republicans wanted a $570,000 cap on damages awarded to patients who prevail in malpractice lawsuits, and they had the votes to stop Kitzhaber's health care reform if they didn't get their way.