malleolus


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Related to malleolus: malleoli

malleolus

 [mah-le´o-lus] (L.)
1. a rounded process.
2. either of the two rounded prominences on either side of the ankle joint; the lateral (or fibular, external, or outer) malleolus is at the lower end of the fibula and the medial (or tibial, internal, or inner) malleolus is at the lower end of the tibia. adj. adj malle´olar.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mal·le·o·lus

, pl.

mal·le·o·li

(ma-lē'ō-lŭs, -lī), [TA] Avoid the mispronunciation malleo'lus.
A rounded bony prominence such as those on either side of the ankle joint.
[L. dim. of malleus, hammer]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

malleolus

(mə-lē′ə-ləs)
n. pl. malleo·li (-lī′)
Either of the two rounded protuberances on each side of the ankle, the inner formed by a projection of the tibia and the outer by a projection of the fibula.

mal·le′o·lar (-ə-lər) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

malleolus

Either of the two rounded bony prominences on either side of the ankle: the external/lateral malleolus (corresponds to the distal fibula) or the internal/medial malleolus (corresponds to the distal tibia).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mal·le·o·lus

, pl. malleoli (ma-lē'ō-lŭs, -lī) [TA]
A rounded bony prominence such as those on either side of the ankle joint.
[L. dim. of malleus, hammer]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

malleolus

Either of the two bony protuberances on either side of the ankle. The inner (medial malleolus) is a process on the lower end of the TIBIA, the outer (lateral malleolus) is a process on the lower end of the FIBULA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
F, fibula; LM, lateral malleolus; MM, medial malleolus; T, talus.
The distributions between the two groups were analyzed with respect to potential confounding factors, including age, gender, presence of PM fracture, fixation of malleolus fracture, fracture dislocation, and time interval of follow-up.
The artery gave two branches; the larger one accompanied the superficial fibular artery that penetrated the fibularis muscle at a mean distance of distance of 18.7 [+ or -] 0.2 cm (ranging from 14.8 to 21) from the lateral malleolus. The other pedicle accompanied an additional nerve to the fibularis brevis muscle.
The incision is made posterior to the medial malleolus, after which the neurovascular bundle is freed and retracted posteriorly to identify the tunnel of the FHL, which is subsequently released.
With the use of a gauge, the median has been calculated exactly in order to find the anatomical landmarks in the right and left laterality to place the markers: on the talus bone, on the popliteal cavity, on the gluteal fold of each leg and on the tibial and peroneal malleolus.
The acquired images demonstrated the neurovascular bundle of the tibial nerve at the level of the ankle, right above the tibial malleolus. The IDEAL sequence provided a four-set images: "water," "fat," "in phase," and "out of phase." The "fat" images and the TSE T1 allowed a better depiction of the intraepineurial fat, with poorer contrast between the fascicles (Figure 1).
An adventitious bursa is created by abnormal shear force and is usually located in the subcutaneous tissue [1] and could develop in the lateral malleolus area because of the repetitive irritation, injury, and inflammation.
The examiner used the other hand to hold the digital inclinometer on the lateral malleolus. The examiner passively moved the participant's hip into IR by moving the foot laterally to the end of the available range when an "unyielding" end-feel was felt and then took the measurement (Figure l).
The tibiotalar joint axis passes distally to the tip of each malleolus; its position may be estimated by placing the tips of your fingers at the most distal ends of the malleoli.
This entails taking three 3-mm skin punch biopsies, one each at the lateral proximal and distal thigh, the third 10 cm proximal to the lateral malleolus. Specimens obtained from these sites in normal individuals feature a rich density of small nerve fibers; in patients with SNF-associated sarcoidosis, there is a notable paucity of the fibers, the physician explained.
Site Latency ms Peak Ampl [micro]V R MEDIAN--Digit II Wrist II 2.40 5.8 R SURAL--Lat Malleolus Calf Lat Malleolus 2.95 4.5 Nerve/Sites Motor Latency Ampl Distance ms mV cm R MEDIAN--APB Wrist 3.70 11.4 6.5 Elbow 8.60 10.0 25 R COMM PERONEAL--EDB Ankle 5.05 0.7 8 Fib Head 15.60 0.6 33 R TIBIAL (KNEE)--AH Ankle 4.65 7.0 9 Knee 17.80 4.5 44.5 Nerve Min F Lat ms R TIBIAL (KNEE)--AH 74.5 Nerve/Sites Sensory Distance cm Velocity m/s R MEDIAN--Digit II Wrist 12 50.0 R SURAL--Lat Malleolus Calf 11 37.3 Nerve/Sites Motor Velocity m/s R MEDIAN--APB Wrist Elbow 51.0 R COMM PERONEAL--EDB Ankle Fib Head 31.3 R TIBIAL (KNEE)--AH Ankle Knee 33.8 Nerve R TIBIAL (KNEE)--AH
For tibia, longitudinal craniomedial incision was taken from medial tibial condyle up to medial malleolus. For radio-ulnar fracture incision from medial epicondyle of humerus to styloid process of radius.