malleable

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malleable

 [mal´e-ah-b'l]
susceptible of being beaten out into a thin plate.

mal·le·a·ble

(mal'ē-ă-bŭl),
Capable of being shaped by being beaten or subjected to pressure; a property of certain metals such as gold and silver.
[L. malleus, a hammer]

malleable

/mal·le·a·ble/ (mal´e-ah-b'l) susceptible of being beaten out into a thin plate.

malleable

[mal′ē·əbəl]
Etymology: L, malleare, to beat
able to be pressed, hammered, or otherwise forced into a shape without breaking.

mal·le·a·ble

(mal'ē-ă-bĕl)
Capable of being shaped by being beaten or by pressure; a property of certain metals such as gold and silver.
[L. malleus, a hammer]

malleable

susceptible of being beaten out into a thin plate.

malleable retractor
a flat elongated piece of metal shaped like a tongue depressor, which can be bent into a desired shape and used as a retractor for soft tissue. See ribbon malleable retractor.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Mason puts it himself, "the significance of a sense of the past -- and the malleability of history -- are themes which are common to all the essays that follow" (6).
Hence Stein attempts to move the field of gay male and lesbian history into the 21st Century field of queer history by stressing the redundancy of fixed gender definitions and the malleability and changeability of the object of sexual desire over the life course.
Scientists try to use models of dendritic growth to predict a metal's strength and malleability.
During those teenage years when the brain is in a very active phase of development and learning to process information about relationships and emotions, there's a concern that these kids are actually going to be wired differently in the future, given the malleability of brains at that age.
Operating by a logic in which structural and aesthetic functions go hand in hand, Nickell clusters them into formations resembling necklaces, chandeliers, bouquets, and windows of leaded glass, harnessing his materials' translucency, malleability, reflectivity, rigidity, and tensile strength.
Such writings would suggest, perhaps even teach, the malleability of the self into different packages, packages whose broad contours were defined, or at least influenced, by the expectations of state administrators.
Similarly, in discussing the malleability that characterized manuscript transmission and the answer and compiler poetry that featured prominently in collections produced by what Harold Love, in Scribal Publication in Seventeenth-Century England, calls "user publication," Marotti includes a generous sampling of hitherto unpublished material.
The polymer has to have not only the malleability of real skin but also the texture.