malinger


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ma·lin·ger

(mă-ling'gĕr),
To engage in malingering.

ma·lin·ger

(mă-ling'gĕr)
To pretend to be ill or disabled, or to feign slow recuperation from an illness or other disabling condition, to arouse sympathy, avoid work or other responsibilities, or continue to receive medical care, medical benefits, or other forms of attention or compensation.
[Fr. malingre, fr. mal-, bad, + Old. Fr. haingre, heingre, thin, haggard]

malinger

(ma-ling'er) [Fr. malingre, weak, sickly]
To feign illness, usually to arouse sympathy, to escape work, or to continue to receive compensation.
See: factitious disorder; Munchausen syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology: Professional Manual.
Potential to malinger should not be confused with malingering behavior.
Validation of malingered amnesia measures with a large clinical sample.
The use of indirect memory tests to assess malingered amnesia: A study of metamemory.
Granted, amnesia claims may be more prevalent and less treatable than other mental disorders; but, as will be discussed, improved techniques to detect malingered amnesia are available, and the treatment of genuine amnesia has improved.
There have been more studies on malingered anterograde amnesia (8) than on retrograde amnesia, making her presentation even more unusual.
Because it is often difficult for a patient to malinger symptoms for a prolonged period, serial observations of a patient's behavior and interview responses over time can provide additional information to make a clinical diagnosis of malingering.
Which test is the gold standard for detecting malingered psychiatric illness?
1999 data imply that neuroscience data may be independent of behavioral data with regard to detecting malingered cognitive deficits, (142) and the two may thus be combined to provide for greater detection accuracy.
Identification of malingered head injury on The Halstead-Reitan Battery.
Second, researchers might consider shifting their perspective on PTSD from exclusion to inclusion: away from the idea that cases based on malingered or factitious memories are necessarily external to the clinical phenomenon that we call "PTSD".
Base rates of negative response bias and malingered neurocognitive dysfunction among criminal defendants referred for neuropsychological evaluation.