malignant tumor


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tumor

 [too´mor]
1. swelling or morbid enlargement; this is one of the cardinal signs of inflammation.
2. a new growth of tissue in which cell multiplication is uncontrolled and progressive. Tumors are also called neoplasms, which means that they are composed of new and actively growing tissue. Their growth is faster than that of normal tissue, continuing after cessation of the stimuli that evoked the growth, and serving no useful physiologic purpose. adj., adj tu´morous.

Tumors are classified in a number of ways, one of the simplest being according to their origin and whether they are malignant or benign. Tumors of mesenchymal origin include fibroelastic tumors and those of bone, fat, blood vessels, and lymphoid tissue; they may be benign or malignant (sarcoma). Tumors of epithelial origin are found in glandular tissue and such organs as the breast, stomach, uterus, or skin; they also may be either benign or malignant (carcinoma). Mixed tumors contain different types of cells derived from the same primary germ layer, and teratomas contain cells derived from more than one germ layer; both kinds may be benign or malignant.
Benign Tumors. Benign tumors do not endanger life unless they interfere with normal functions of other organs or affect a vital organ. They grow slowly, pushing aside normal tissue but not invading it. They are usually encapsulated, well demarcated growths. They are not metastatic; that is, they do not form secondary tumors in other organs. Benign tumors usually respond favorably to surgical treatment and some forms of radiation therapy.
Malignant Tumors. These tumors are composed of embryonic, primitive, or poorly differentiated cells. They grow in a disorganized manner and so rapidly that nutrition of the cells becomes a problem. For this reason necrosis and ulceration are characteristic of malignant tumors. They also invade surrounding tissues and are metastatic, initiating the growth of similar tumors in distant organs. (See also cancer.)
Gross appearance of benign (A) and malignant (B) tumors. From Damjanov, 2000.
benign tumor one that lacks the properties of invasiveness and metastasis and that is usually surrounded by a fibrous capsule; its cells also show a lesser degree of anaplasia than those of a malignant tumor do.
bladder tumor a tumor of the urinary bladder; see also bladder cancer.
brain tumor see brain tumor.
brown tumor a giant-cell granuloma produced in and replacing bone, occurring in osteitis fibrosa cystica and due to hyperparathyroidism.
Burkitt's tumor Burkitt's lymphoma.
Buschke-Löwenstein tumor a slow-growing mass of warts found usually in the prepuce but sometimes elsewhere in the perianal region; it starts as a plaque and may grow into a large cauliflowerlike mass. Called also giant condyloma.
carcinoid tumor carcinoid (def. 1).
carotid body tumor a chemodectoma of a carotid body, found as a firm round mass at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery.
connective tissue tumor any tumor arising from a connective tissue structure, such as a fibroma or sarcoma.
desmoid tumor desmoid (def. 1).
endodermal sinus tumor yolk sac tumor.
erectile tumor cavernous hemangioma.
Ewing's tumor Ewing's sarcoma.
false tumor pseudotumor.
fibroid tumor
germ cell tumor any of a group of tumors arising from primitive germ cells, usually of the testis or ovum; they range from benign to highly malignant. Types include germinoma, yolk sac tumor, teratoma, embryonal carcinoma, and some types of choriocarcinoma; many tumors are mixtures of types.
giant cell tumor
1. a benign or malignant tumor containing giant cells; see under carcinoma, granuloma, and sarcoma.
2. a bone tumor, ranging from benign to frankly malignant, composed of cellular spindle cell stroma containing multinucleated giant cells resembling osteoclasts.
3. a small yellow benign tumorlike nodule of tendon sheath origin, usually of the wrist and fingers or ankle and toes, laden with lipophages and containing multinucleated giant cells.
glomus tumor
1. a blue-red, extremely painful chemodectoma involving an arteriovenous anastomosis or cluster of blood cells, which may be found anywhere in the skin, most often in the distal portion of the fingers and toes, especially beneath the nail. Such tumors may also occur in the stomach and nasal cavity.
granular cell tumor a relatively common neoplasm whose cells have a granular appearance by light microscopy; it is usually benign but occasionally malignant, and multiple tumors may occur. It can be found anywhere but is most often seen in the oral cavity, especially in the tongue.
granulosa tumor (granulosa cell tumor) see granulosa cell tumor.
granulosa-theca cell tumor see granulosa-theca cell tumor.
heterologous tumor one made up of tissue differing from that in which it grows.
homoiotypic tumor (homologous tumor) one made up of tissue resembling that in which it grows.
Hürthle cell tumor see hürthle cell tumor.
islet cell tumor a tumor of the islands of Langerhans; many secrete excessive amounts of hormones. Types include gastrinoma, glucagonoma, insulinoma, somatostatinoma, and vipoma.
Krukenberg's tumor see krukenberg's tumor.
lipoid cell tumor of ovary a usually benign ovarian tumor composed of eosinophilic cells or cells with lipoid vacuoles; it causes masculinization.
tumor lysis syndrome severe hyperphosphatemia, hyperkalemia, hyperuricemia, and hypocalcemia occurring after effective induction chemotherapy of rapidly growing malignant neoplasms; thought to be due to release of intracellular products after cell lysis.
malignant tumor one that has the properties of invasiveness and metastasis and that shows a greater degree of anaplasia than a benign tumor does.
mast cell tumor mastocytoma.
melanotic neuroectodermal tumor a benign, rapidly growing, dark tumor of the jaw or occasionally some other site, almost always seen in infants; called also melanoameloblastoma.
mixed tumor one composed of more than one type of neoplastic tissue.
tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) familial periodic fever.
organoid tumor teratoma.
peripheral neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) any of a heterogeneous group of neoplasms originating in supporting structures or neuronal tissue, primarily of the extremities, pelvis, or chest wall; seen most often in adolescents and young adults and frequently having widespread metastases.
plasma cell tumor
1. plasma cell dyscrasias.
sand tumor psammoma.
Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor androblastoma (def. 1).
theca cell tumor a fibroidlike tumor of the ovary containing yellow areas of fatty material derived from theca cells.
turban t's multiple cylindromas of the scalp that are grouped together so as to cover the entire scalp.
Wilms' tumor a rapidly developing malignant mixed tumor of the kidneys, made up of embryonal elements, occurring chiefly in children before the seventh year; a genetic component is suspected in its etiology. It may be accompanied by congenital defects such as urinary tract abnormalities, absent iris of the eye, and asymmetry of parts. With treatment, the prognosis is excellent. Called also embryonal carcinosarcoma and nephroblastoma.
yolk sac tumor a malignant germ cell tumor of children that represents a proliferation of both yolk sac endoderm and extraembryonic mesenchyme. It produces α-fetoprotein and most often occurs in the testes, but is also seen in the ovaries and some extragonadal sites. Called also endodermal sinus tumor.

ma·lig·nant tu·mor

a tumor that invades surrounding tissues, is usually capable of producing metastases, may recur after attempted removal, and is likely to cause death of the host unless adequately treated.
See also: cancer.

ma·lig·nant tu·mor

(mă-lig'nănt tū'mŏr)
A tumor that invades surrounding tissues and is usually capable of producing metastases; may recur after attempted removal; likely to cause death of the host unless adequately treated.
See also: cancer

Malignant tumor

An abnormal proliferation of cells that can spread to other sites.
Mentioned in: Retinoblastoma

Patient discussion about malignant tumor

Q. how many types of cancer are they?

A. There are over 200 different types of cancer. You can develop cancer in any body organ. There are over 60 different organs in the body where you can get a cancer.

Each organ is made up of several different tissue types. For example, there is usually a surface covering of skin or epithelial tissue. Underneath that there will be some connective tissue, often containing gland cells. Underneath that there is often a layer of muscle tissue and so on. Each type of tissue is made up of specific types of cells. Cancer can develop in just about any type of cell in the body. So there is almost always more than one type of cancer that can develop in any one organ.

Q. why does it call "cancer"?can you treat cancer?

A. the name came from the appearance of the cut surface of a solid malignant tumour, with the veins stretched on all sides as the animal the crab has its feet, whence it derives its name. Hippocrates first called it in that name after describing few types of cancer.
some of the cancers are treatable but that is a big subject. there are some very nice videos here on the site that can give you a clue about that. just search them there ^ :)

Q. Cancer - incurable? When i was surfing the internet for the incurable disease, i found CANCER is one among them. Is there not a medicine found yet? Really is it incurable?

A. I like to share with you what i read from a book it said 'With modern day treatments many cancers are completely cured but unfortunately there are still many others which are not.

Although it is not always possible to be certain, doctors are often able to tell whether or not a particular cancer might be cured. Even if cancer is incurable they will usually still offer treatment in the hope of prolonging life and, controlling, symptoms.'
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOBvDTf9ohQ

More discussions about malignant tumor
References in periodicals archive ?
RESULTS: A total of 16 malignant soft tissue tumors out of a total of 562 malignant tumors of all types were included in the present study for final analysis.
All benign and malignant tumors (including recurrence) were managed by surgical excision of the lesion and lid reconstruction where ever required.
Table 1: Distribution of different types of benign and malignant tumor Sl no.
Malignant tumors of major salivary gland origin: A matched-pair analysis of the role of combined surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.
Malignant tumors, though occurring in a smaller number, continue to be a challenge to the surgeons and pathologists due to their proximity to the facial nerve and their varying degree of malignancy.
In a study of four hundred and ninety-eight patients with gynecological malignant tumor treated surgically, Zhang and colleagues concluded that age, cardiovascular comorbidity and postoperative hemostatics dose were independent risk factors for DVT.5 However, some authors held different viewpoints, in another study of 120 cases with gynecological malignant tumor treated surgically or conservatively, Yan suggested that hyperlipidemia, diabetes, pathological type of cancer, surgery and radiotherapy were the independent risk factors of DVT in patients with gynecological malignant tumor.6
M2 EQUITYBITES-January 29, 2019-Innovent Biologics Inc submits NDA for biosimilar product candidate of bevacizumab with the NMPA for multiple types of malignant tumors
Benign tumors were reported as glomus tumor, epidermal cyst, giant-cell tumors of the tendon sheath, pyogenic granuloma, neurinoma, schwannoma, lipoma, cystic hygroma, hemangioma, arteriovenous malformation, fibroma, fibrolipoma, ganglion cyst, infantile digital myofibroblastoma, dermatofibroma, and verruca vulgaris; whereas the malignant tumors were identified as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), malignant melanoma, fibrohistiocytic malignant tumor, and synovial sarcoma.
Thirty-one (25%) patients had benign tumor (fibroadenomas) and 91 (75%) had malignant tumor. The subjects with malignant tumors were considerably older, age median 68 years (interquartile range 57-76 years; p<0.001).
The commonest malignant tumor of the parotid (27.8%) and the minor salivary glands (8.3%) was mucoepidermoid carcinoma (Figure 3).
Transplant-associated malignant tumors are the leading cause of death in patients who have survived at least 10 years after transplantation.
Type of malignant tumor were; mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, acinic cell carcinoma, malignant mixed tumor and large duct adenocarcinoma.