malignant microcalcifications

malignant microcalcifications

Aggregates of precipitated calcium salts, which by light microscopy appear as purplish crystalline debris. Microcalcifications appear on mammography as scattered or aggregated white dots, and are often (up to 20% of cases) associated with breast cancer.

Microcalcifications
▪ Type I—Occur in benign lesions of the breast; type-I MCs are birefringent, colourless, composed of calcium oxalate, and poorly visualised without polarisation. 
▪ Type II—Occur in benign and malignant lesions of the breast; type-II MCs appear as a deep purplish colour by light microscopy, and composed of calcium phosphate.
References in periodicals archive ?
have shown that the Type II microcalcifications manufactured in malignant ducts have a higher concentration of protein compared with calcium, and used this strategy to distinguish benign from malignant microcalcifications, using Raman spectroscopy.
Indications for surgery Breast-conserving surgery * Localised DCIS (<4 cm extent of malignant microcalcifications on MMG) Mastectomy (with or without immediate breast reconstruction) * Widespread DCIS ([greater than or equal to] 4 cm extent of malignant microcalcifications on MMG, or micropapillary) * Persistently involved margins after two attempts at re-excision * Patient preference * Multicentric disease Contraindications to BCS * Previous radiotherapy * Connective tissue disorder * Pregnancy * Non-compliant patient Table II.
The percentage of detection of masses was much higher if only clusters of malignant microcalcifications >10 mm were considered.
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