malignant ameloblastoma

malignant ameloblastoma

A neoplasm in which the pattern of an ameloblastoma and cytological features of malignancy are shown by the primary growth in the jaws and/or by any metastatic growth. Tumours meeting these criteria may arise as a result of malignant change in a pre-existing ameloblastoma, or possibly as a primary malignant ameloblastoma not preceded by an ameloblastoma.
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The term malignant ameloblastoma should be confined to those ameloblastomas that metastasize despite an apparently typical benign histology in both the primary and the metastatic lesions [7-10].
Carcinomas associated with ameloblastoma have had several terminologies within the medical literature, thus posing a problem in accurately separating malignant ameloblastoma fromameloblastic carcinoma.
Metastasizing ameloblastoma ambiguously termed as malignant ameloblastoma is "a neoplasm in which the features of an ameloblastoma are shown by the primary growth in the jaws and by any metastatic growth." Basically this definition proves the presence of metastases, with histologic features having a minor role in diagnosis.
According to Okada et al., differences actually do exist in biologic behavior of malignant ameloblastoma and metastasizing ameloblastoma.
Though cytologic atypia is not a feature of malignant ameloblastoma, spindling of the cells is recognized in some solid proliferating areas which seems to be one of the peculiar characteristics of malignant ameloblastoma.
Most cases of malignant ameloblastoma to the lungs appear to be associated with hematogenous route.
Muller, "Malignant ameloblastoma or ameloblastic carcinoma," Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, vol.
Malignant ameloblastoma distinguishes from ameloblastoma by the presence of metastases.
Ameloblastic carcinomas seem to be more common compared to malignant ameloblastoma in the ratio 2:1.
Naagai divided the malignant tumours with features of ameloblastoma into two groups: 1) malignant ameloblastoma 2) ameloblastic carcinoma.
(5) The term 'malignant ameloblastoma' is used if the primary tumour shows any features of malignancy (e.g.
Malignant ameloblastomas, which are very rare and manifest with metastases, most commonly to the lungs, regional lymph nodes, pleura, vertebrae, skull, diaphragm, liver, parotid glands, and small intestine.