malic


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Related to malic: malic acid, Maleic

malic

(mā′lĭk) (măl′ĭk) [L. malum, apple]
Pert. to apples.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zarko Beric, 12, who lost a leg in a mine blast, visited the home of 14-year-old Malic Bradoric in Klokotnica - a village normally restricted to Serbs for fear of reprisals.
The microbial biosynthesis of malic acid is estimated to create enormous opportunities for market players over the next five years owing to associated drawback of the petrochemical manufacturing process.
In peach cultivars, five organic acids were identified: malic acid, tartaric acid, citric acid, succinic acid and fumaric acid (Table 2).
No family portrait comes close, although the first baby bootie of Malic's only son hangs nearby, the only other treasure allowed to bask in their glow.
The combined treatment of 2% lactic acid and 2% malic acid led to the highest log reduction of 4.14 CFU per gram.
[ClickPress, Tue Apr 30 2013] Acidulants Market by Types (Citric acid, Phosphoric acid, Acetic acid, Malic acid, Lactic acid), Applications (Beverages, Sauces, dressings and condiments,Processed foods, Bakery and confectionary), and Geography (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and ROW): Global Trends and Forecasts up to 2018
Feeding dehydroepiandrosterone to rats induces enhanced formation of several liver enzymes among which are mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) and cytosolic malic enzyme.
After the yeast converts the first batch of sugars to alcohol, there's a secondary fermentation that happens, as bacteria in the mixture convert malic acid-which has a harsh taste-into lactic acid, which is smoother.
typhimurium in the chicken breast by infusing combinations of organic acids, specifically acetic, citric, malic and tartaric acids, into the meat.
NBI says they are 25% less acidic than citrus juices and contain malic acid, which promotes healthy muscle function.
ARGENTINE wine producers have a stay of execution over their right to sell wines in the European Union (EU) containing malic acid, which is used to correct acidity and banned in EU wine production.
In addition to organic wine gum, recent organic developments also include fat coated raw materials, like malic or citric acid, which are used to sparkle on gums, jellies and extruded strips.