malformation


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deformity

 [de-for´mĭ-te]
distortion of any part or of the body in general; called also malformation.
Arnold-Chiari deformity a congenital anomaly in which the cerebellum and medulla oblongata protrude down into the cervical spinal canal through the foramen magnum; it is almost always associated with meningomyelocele and hydrocephalus.
Madelung's deformity radial deviation of the hand secondary to overgrowth of the distal ulna or shortening of the radius.

mal·for·ma·tion

(mal'fōr-mā'shŭn),
Failure of proper or normal development; more specifically, a primary structural defect that results from a localized error of morphogenesis; for example, cleft lip. Most malformations are considered to be a defect of a morphogenetic or developmental field that responds as a coordinated unit to embryonic interaction. Compare: deformation.

malformation

/mal·for·ma·tion/ (-for-ma´shun)
1. a type of anomaly.
2. a morphologic defect of an organ or larger region of the body, resulting from an intrinsically abnormal developmental process.

malformation

(măl′fôr-mā′shən)
n.
1. The condition of being malformed; deformity.
2. A body part that is malformed; a deformity.

malformation

[mal′fôrmā′shən]
Etymology: L, malus, bad, forma, shape
an anomalous structure in the body. See also congenital anomaly.

malformation

An isolated birth defect caused by abnormal growth of an organ, which, if surgical correction is possible, usually has a good prognosis.

malformation

Neonatology An isolated birth defect caused by abnormal growth of an organ, which, if surgical correction is possible, usually has a good prognosis. See Arnold-Chiari malformation, Arteriovenous malformation, Birth defect, Cerebral cavernous malformation, Cleft palate, Cystic adenomatoid malformation, Dandy-Walker malformation, Dysmorphology, Spina bifida, Teratogenesis.

mal·for·ma·tion

(mal'fōr-mā'shŭn)
Failure of normal development; more specifically, a primary structural defect that results from a localized error of morphogenesis; e.g., cleft lip.
Compare: deformation

malformation

Any bodily deformity or structural abnormality resulting from a defect in development or growth.

malformation

failure of normal development

mal·for·ma·tion

(mal'fōr-mā'shŭn)
Failure of normal development; more specifically, a primary structural defect that results from a localized error of morphogenesis; e.g., cleft lip.

malformation

defective or abnormal formation; deformity; an anatomical aberration, especially one acquired during development.

Patient discussion about malformation

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

More discussions about malformation
References in periodicals archive ?
SCC malformations are mostly reported in congenital syndromes with multiple deformities such as coloboma, heart defects, atresia choanae, growth retardation, genital abnormalities, and ear abnormalities syndrome.
This entity should be distinguished from Parkes-Weber syndrome, which is similar, but features formation of arteriovenous malformations (leading to high output cardiac failure) and no lymphatic malformations.
5] In three different studies from India, [6,7,8] the rate of congenital malformation among the stillbirths was observed to be as 20.
Later, more congenital malformations were linked to valproic acid, including oral cleft, cardiac and limb defects, developmental delays, lower IQ, and even autism.
Treatment of venous malformations by direct injection with ethanol.
Successful management without protective colostomy in an adult patient with anorectal malformation.
Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage caused by an unusual association of developmental venous anomaly and arteriovenous malformation.
MR venograms are fantastic for detecting truncular blood flow where there typically are no anomalies in the vast majority of patients with isolated venous malformations, but on contrast-enhanced MRI these convoluted cluster of anomalous veins light up like Christmas trees.
With the addition of the brain through foramen magnum in the special position, chiari malformation could be regarded as a kind of disease, related to evolution.
The diagnosis and the classification of the vascular malformations have a great importance on the treatment plan of the lesions.
sup][5],[6],[7],[8],[9] Statistical reports show that 75-80% of pediatric intracranial arteriovenous malformation (ICAVM) patients with bleeding presentation experience a mortality rate high to 25%, whereas the rate is only 6-10% in adult patients.