maleficence


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maleficence

(mă-lĕf′ĭ-sĕns) [L. maleficentia, evildoing]
Acting in a deliberately harmful manner toward others.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, one can observe in both Sade and Smith a curious asymmetry in the relationship between beneficence and maleficence.
One finds the same asymmetry between the economies of beneficence and maleficence in the text of an author who is much closer to Sade than is Adam Smith, in the Maximes of La Rochefoucauld.
The link between beneficence and resentment is not mirrored by a corresponding link between maleficence and gratitude.
Men and women concurred in suspecting Heard and Robinson of witchcraft, but female experience of their maleficence tended, not surprisingly, to concentrate on the interruption of domestic routines.
This latter case is not untypical of those involving several indictments in which the names of witnesses are listed: women formed a higher proportion of the witnesses to the charges of earlier maleficence than to those of more recent provenance.
Harming a patient without consent is not medical paternalism but medical maleficence.
He applied ethical principles to his practice: do no harm to the patient (primum non nocere), practise beneficence, refrain from maleficence, and maintain patient confidentiality.